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Film Look vs Progressive Scan


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#1 AdVision TV

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 06:53 AM

I always have a dilemma in how to shoot short films when I want that "film look". I used to use video which is interlaced - and in the edit blend the fields together - or deinterlace - which gives that classic film look at the cost of slightly lowering the resolution.

The proper way of doing this would obviosuly be to shoot Progressive - but every time i pick up a camera and put it in progressive mode it looks dreadful in the viewfinder and on a monitor - ie stroby movements which really distracts me - a lot worse than it would look if i deinterlaced it after.

I understand that adjusting the shutter speed can sometimes help - but I havn't really seen any proof of this. Can anyone help - or had a similar experience as I feel technically I should be shooting Progressive to benefit from the full resolution.

Many thanks

Matt
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 09:52 AM

Shoot progressive and get used to the strobey/flickering image on the monitor. You can look at 24P video material on TV, Sci-Fi Channel shows like "Battlestar Galactica", "Stargate Atlantis", etc. or the last season of "Enterprise" (now on DVD), or some Showtime Channel shows like "Huff", or many sitcoms like "Reba" or "Bernie Mac", or movies on DVD like the last two "Star Wars" films, or "Sin City", etc.

The 24P mode always looks the worse for strobe & flicker on the set, especially in any onboard LCD monitors. You just have to get used to it. Correct shutter speed for 24P would be 1/48th to simulate a 180 degree shutter. Also realize that 24 fps, even in film, IS strobey, but if your shutter is closed down, it will be more obvious (like in the fight scenes in "Saving Private Ryan" and "Gladiator".)
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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 09:56 AM

Shoot progressive and get used to the strobey/flickering image on the monitor. You can look at 24P video material on TV, Sci-Fi Channel shows like "Battlestar Galactica", "Stargate Atlantis", etc. or the last season of "Enterprise" (now on DVD), or some Showtime Channel shows like "Huff", or many sitcoms like "Reba" or "Bernie Mac", or movies on DVD like the last two "Star Wars" films, or "Sin City", etc.

The 24P mode always looks the worse for strobe & flicker on the set, especially in any onboard LCD monitors. You just have to get used to it.

David,

Is this because the 24P is being played back at 24FPS on the set as opposed to the doubled 48 "flashes" per second frame rate that 24 FPS film is actually projected at? Or is it some sort of pull-down/pull-up artifact?

Edmond, OK
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 04:18 PM

Hi,

> Is this because the 24P is being played back at 24FPS on the set as opposed to the doubled 48 "flashes" per
> second frame rate that 24 FPS film is actually projected at? Or is it some sort of pull-down/pull-up artifact?

Actually most 24p is played back on a 48hz raster - watch the monitor when you plug it in, it'll come up as "48i". Sony call this Segmented Frame, but it's really just a way of displaying it that isn't headache-inducingly flickery. Exceptions to this are Varicam, HD100 and possibly HVX-200, which display on a 60p raster with 3:2 style frame duplication.

Phil
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