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Shooting the 64t film


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#1 Ronney Ross

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 08:39 PM

I have an lower-end cam. (Sears) this camera allows to manual exposure capabilities but a fixed shutter.
I want to order a couple of carts next week, being that I am waiting to check out my test footage first hopefully it will be back by Tuesday. Just wondering if I re-notched to cartridge to hopefully get it to read at 100 asa would I have to underexposed,overexpose, or go with light meter readings, Also wondering will renotching give a look close to the 100d reversal stock.

I read up a on this a little but could use much help on this issue.

Thanks,
Ronney Ross
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 09:41 PM

E64T should be notched as a tungsten film, so the orange correction filter should be in place for daylight exposure. With a manual exposure camera, base your exposure on EI-64 with tungsten light and no filter, or EI-40 outdoors with the orange filter in place.
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#3 KKB22

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 10:02 PM

E64T should be notched as a tungsten film, so the orange correction filter should be in place for daylight exposure. With a manual exposure camera, base your exposure on EI-64 with tungsten light and no filter, or EI-40 outdoors with the orange filter in place.



I recently shot a cartridge of the 64T with an old manaul Sankyo camera. The 85 filter did not fit into place like it should have. Is there a trigger in the camera or on the cartridge that I can over ride to make the filter come into position?

There is a screw hole on the top of the camera that you trigger to remove the filter for tungsten lighting but that isn't what I am after for exteriors.
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#4 Maulubekotofa

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 10:44 PM

the sears camera may not read anthything other than 160 ro 40 asa so renoching may not be of any use
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 11:45 PM

the sears camera may not read anthything other than 160 ro 40 asa so renoching may not be of any use


They said it had manual exposure capabilities. If so, they just need to be sure the orange filter (internal or external) is in place for daylight exposure, meter the light, and set the exposure manually.
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#6 S8 Booster

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 12:47 AM

I recently shot a cartridge of the 64T with an old manaul Sankyo camera. The 85 filter did not fit into place like it should have. Is there a trigger in the camera or on the cartridge that I can over ride to make the filter come into position?

There is a screw hole on the top of the camera that you trigger to remove the filter for tungsten lighting but that isn't what I am after for exteriors.


you may try to verify the built in 85 filter control vs cart notching as seen below.
this info is for the 200t cart - how to allow use of the built in 85 filter as the 200t cart is incorrectly notched from kodak. the principle for 85 filter control is the same for any cart if your camera is fully compliant to to the standard.

here is what you need to do to make the cam read the cart as 160/100:

this is where the filter notch is located - open it and the cam is allowed to read it as either 160 for tungetsen (when the built in 85 filter is disabled) or 100 with the filter in place for daylight shoot.

Click images for biger size:

Posted Image

how to mod and why:
Posted Image

s8hôôt


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#7 Maulubekotofa

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 10:58 AM

if your sears camera is a low light XL model then it is best to assume a 220 detgrees shiuttter. if it is not a low light xl camera, then base your light meter settings on a 160 degrees shutter.

anotherwords if you are using a still camera light meter you have to account for the internal shutter speed of your camera. this is typically 1/40th of second for a regular camera or 1/30th of a second for a xl camera

this is the shutter speed to use to get the right f-stoip
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#8 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 05:50 PM

Keep it simple. if your cam reads 40/160 only and your meter is reading f5.6, use manual adjustment and set -1/3 from f8. in other words, set your exposure 2/3rds of the way to the next highest # in your meter.

Edited by Skratch, 25 March 2006 - 05:51 PM.

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#9 KKB22

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 05:50 PM

you may try to verify the built in 85 filter control vs cart notching as seen below.
this info is for the 200t cart - how to allow use of the built in 85 filter as the 200t cart is incorrectly notched from kodak. the principle for 85 filter control is the same for any cart if your camera is fully compliant to to the standard.
s8hôôt



Thanks man!! :D
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#10 Ronney Ross

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 10:26 AM

Thanks all for the wealth of info.
-Ronney Ross
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