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Film Streaking Mystery


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#1 Davideo

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 01:39 PM

I've experienced white streaking lines on Plus X Super 8 film and most people I've talked to are stumped, including those at FilmShooting.com forum. To save time, here's the link to the discussions so far which includes a QuickTime clip of the problem:

http://www.filmshoot...pic.php?t=13458

Hope you can help solve this as another filmmaker had the same problem.

Thanks.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 01:56 PM

I've experienced white streaking lines on Plus X Super 8 film and most people I've talked to are stumped, including those at FilmShooting.com forum. To save time, here's the link to the discussions so far which includes a QuickTime clip of the problem:

http://www.filmshoot...pic.php?t=13458

Hope you can help solve this as another filmmaker had the same problem.

Thanks.


The marks are not typical of any film-related problem. Could be a scanning or transfer issue. Look at the film original itself. Are there any marks in the film image? Are there any scratches or kink marks?
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#3 Davideo

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 02:06 PM

The marks are directly on the film and it was confirmed through projection and close look on my lupe. They look like video dropouts, but this is on film. The film surface is clean, so am wondering if it's a processing problem because anothr filmmaker had the same problem with the same lab.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 02:10 PM

The marks are directly on the film and it was confirmed through projection and close look on my lupe. They look like video dropouts, but this is on film. The film surface is clean, so am wondering if it's a processing problem because anothr filmmaker had the same problem with the same lab.


Then they could be horizontal cinch or pressure marks caused by flattening a dished roll. Never have seen cinch marks so severe and numerous.
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#5 Davideo

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 02:15 PM

Woukd the lab be the culprit or a bad batch of Plus X stock? The other filmmaker's problem was also limited to Plus X. His Tri-X stuff, as well as mine, came out fine.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 03:31 PM

Woukd the lab be the culprit or a bad batch of Plus X stock? The other filmmaker's problem was also limited to Plus X. His Tri-X stuff, as well as mine, came out fine.


If all the damaged Plus-X was from the same batch, and they were processed at different labs, it could be a stock problem. Do you have unexposed cartridges from the same batch? Where were the two incidents processed? Where did you buy the film?

Normally, you should provide samples of the problem and any unused cartridges from the same batch to the place you bought the film, who will return it to Kodak for investigation. The other filmmaker should do the same. If you bought the film directly from Kodak, return the samples to the location you purchased them from, along with a full description of the problem.
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#7 Davideo

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 03:59 PM

I purchased the Plus X stock from the University Co-Op in Austin, Texas. I shot one roll of Plus X on my Canon 514 XL-S, processed it at Film & Video Services in MN and it came out okay. I purchased another roll of Plus X from the same batch at University Co-Op, shot it on my Nizo S800, processed at the same lab, and the white streaking happened. The processing was done at the same time as the other filmmaker at the same lab who also had streaking. So, the common denominator is the timing of the processing but difference in camera.
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