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Color Temp Conversion for 5217


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#1 Nathan D. Lee

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 09:11 PM

According to the box of Super 8 Vision2 200T I just bought, to convert for daylight it suggests an 85 filter saying it makes its effective ISO=125. According to the ASC manual (9th Edition) the 85 filter is supposed to convert 5500 to 3400 and that it is the 85B that converts it to 3200. It also states that the exposure compensation is 2/3 a stop which makes the rating 120.
I know on the speed issue I am splitting hairs, and on the temp issue it can be corrected in the transfer without a bump. I was really wondering if either of these sources have it backwards or if its just too close to make a difference.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 11:07 PM

When Kodak says "85" on the boxes for the color neg tungsten-balanced stocks, they mean "85B". "85" has become a nickname for the 85B filter these days, like "put an 85ND combo on, or put an 85/Pola on, or put the 85 in..."

Most light meters allow you to set ASA ratings in one-third stop jumps, so basically your choices are like: ...40, 50, 64, 80, 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, 500... There is no "120" option, nor is there "128" as in, one-stop faster than 64 ASA. 125 is close enough. Anything less than 1/3 of a stop is insignificant.
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#3 Bon Sawyer

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 11:39 PM

Just in case you were not aware, you will need to use an external 85/85B filter, as Kodak's notching of the Vision 200T cartridges disables the internal filter of most Super8 cameras. In addition, most internal lightmeters will meter the film as 100 ASA, so unless you are using an external meter, you will need to either compensate for this, or simply be aware of the 1-stop over-exposure (which many people consider to be very good for this stock/format anyway).

Bon

P.S. Although, as David has pointed out, there really is no difference between ASA 120 and 125, I'm curious to know how you came up with the number 120? By my calculations, 2/3 of a stop less than 200 is ~126...
200 * 2^(-2/3) = 125.9921
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 12:25 AM

If you really want to be picky, I believe the 85B actually cuts slightly more than 2/3's of a stop, more like 3/4...
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#5 Nathan D. Lee

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 02:01 AM

Makes sense, thank you both.
I have a Minolta Autometer III light meter and my ASA rating go from 40, 50, 64, 80, 100, 120, 160, etc... They are all apart by 1/3 except for the 120... that is odd but not important.
Thanks for the 85 help!

Nathan
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