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Looking for old film stock...


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#1 sinisa.kukic

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 06:02 PM

Hi. I'm looking for old 16mm or 35mm color film stock. Recans, short ends, anything. I'm trying to piece enough stock together for a 30 min experimental film. I know I can get cheap stock from Kodak with my student discount but I like the look of old stock especially if it's been mistreated. Willing to pay for the film (student budget). Let me know if you have some cans in your fridge and you need to make room for food.

Thanks
Sinisa
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#2 Bryan Darling

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 06:54 PM

Hi. I'm looking for old 16mm or 35mm color film stock. Recans, short ends, anything. I'm trying to piece enough stock together for a 30 min experimental film. I know I can get cheap stock from Kodak with my student discount but I like the look of old stock especially if it's been mistreated. Willing to pay for the film (student budget). Let me know if you have some cans in your fridge and you need to make room for food.

Thanks
Sinisa
kukic_sinisa@yahoo.com


Are you looking for color? If so I have some 16mm Vision 500T in 100' and 400' I'm looking to clear out of the freezer.
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#3 Filip Plesha

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 08:13 PM

If so I have some 16mm Vision 500T


That would hardly qualify as "old stock", it's not that much different from vision2 500T
For it to make a significance in look, he'd have to go back a few generations, possibly
to pre-EXR stock, but I don't know what are the stocking habits of you cinematographers..

Accoarding to some old Kodak article, some people In Iran (I think) managed to shoot a film on some 5247 from 70's. Of course it had probably gone all fogy, but that's a genuine old look.

I'd be really unlucky If I were a cinematographer. For still photography, Kodak still makes some really old films that were unchanged over their history. Like EPR, from 1976. It looks just as it did back then. Then EPY from 1986 etc. That's really cool.
There are no such choices in cinema today. All modern.

Old film stocks are like tube amps, or vynil records. They have so much character, and make all the new stuff look too clean and "regular". Film look was always about anomalies and limitations. By fixing anomalies and expanding limitations, film manufacturers are taking the film look out of film.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 08:41 PM

Much as it might give interesting "retro" looks, maintaining old film formulations can add greatly to the cost of manufacture and inventory, so the ability to offer older motion picture stocks is limited. Sometimes the chemicals for an older film are no longer available, or would have to be remade at great expense per batch.

I guess that Kodak Entertainment Imaging (motion picture products) just got too good at continually improving our products, rather than resting on our laurels. ;)
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#5 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 09:02 PM

sticking with a smaller guage like 16mm will reveal more flaws
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#6 sinisa.kukic

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 09:47 PM

[quote name='tornsprocket' post='97761' date='Mar 26 2006, 03:54 PM']
Are you looking for color? If so I have some 16mm Vision 500T in 100' and 400' I'm looking to clear out of the freezer.
[/quote]

Hi Bryan,

Thanks for the response. I'm interested. How much do you have?

thanks
Sinisa




Old film stocks are like tube amps, or vynil records. They have so much character, and make all the new stuff look too clean and "regular". Film look was always about anomalies and limitations. By fixing anomalies and expanding limitations, film manufacturers are taking the film look out of film.
[/quote]

i love the sound of old records. so organic.

i'm not a fan of the new vision 2 stuff. just a personal thing. i like grain. i guess you can always push the new stocks.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 10:10 PM

i'm not a fan of the new vision 2 stuff. just a personal thing. i like grain. i guess you can always push the new stocks.


If you like grain, you can always:

* Use a smaller format
* Use faster film than you need
* Underexpose
* Push process
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#8 Bryan Darling

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 12:33 AM

Hi Bryan,

Thanks for the response. I'm interested. How much do you have?

thanks
Sinisa
Old film stocks are like tube amps, or vynil records. They have so much character, and make all the new stuff look too clean and "regular". Film look was always about anomalies and limitations. By fixing anomalies and expanding limitations, film manufacturers are taking the film look out of film.
i love the sound of old records. so organic.

i'm not a fan of the new vision 2 stuff. just a personal thing. i like grain. i guess you can always push the new stocks.



I have 1- 400' can, 15- 100' rolls
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#9 Filip Plesha

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 07:32 AM

Much as it might give interesting "retro" looks, maintaining old film formulations can add greatly to the cost of manufacture and inventory, so the ability to offer older motion picture stocks is limited. Sometimes the chemicals for an older film are no longer available, or would have to be remade at great expense per batch.

I guess that Kodak Entertainment Imaging (motion picture products) just got too good at continually improving our products, rather than resting on our laurels. wink.gif


Well luckily it works for Kodak professional imaging division.


But on the other hand, you have introduced EPY into super8, which is also one of older formulations.
Sure it was tweaked for super8, but its still the same look.
I believe it was introduced in 1991, which is quite "retro" nowdays.
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#10 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 10:58 AM

One thing that is very different for motion picture products compared to still film products is that if you keep an old film in the catalog, you generally need to have enough film in inventory to meet the needs of a feature production. So you are betting that a few productions will use that several hundred thousand feet of "niche" market film, before you have to discard it for old age.

In other words, motion pictures require higher volumes of film be in inventory, so niche products can really add to inventory cost and waste if you have to discard an older "retro" film that might find only a few users each year.
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