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Curious about Photography Lighting Kits


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#1 Mitch Lusas

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 01:37 AM

I've been doing headshots for awhile, but unfortunately for my models/actors, I've been using Mole Juniors and Babys. Needless to say, it gets hot. I'm looking to get a lighting kit for photography. If you have any preferences, I'd love to hear about them. Having never messed with this type of lighting, I'm curious and thrilled to try something new.

Thanks for any help. Blessings,

Mitch Lusas
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 02:43 AM

Kinoflo and various other manufacturers of fluorescent lighting make a variety of units that are color-correct, soft quality, and low temperature.

http://kinoflo.com/
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#3 Mitch Lusas

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 10:55 AM

Kinoflo and various other manufacturers of fluorescent lighting make a variety of units that are color-correct, soft quality, and low temperature.

http://kinoflo.com/


Kinoflo's seem to be a great option, considering their possible duel-purpose in cinematography and model photography. Initially I was curious about photoflash lights. However, you have raised an interesting question: are more photographers using kinoflos for their lighting of subjects?

Thanks for your help Michael.
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 02:30 AM

However, you have raised an interesting question: are more photographers using kinoflos for their lighting of subjects?


I couldn't really tell you what still photographers are using -- that's your realm! ;-)

Kinoflos tend to be limited in the amount of sheer footcandles they put out. Cinematographers tend to use them more as fill units when working in the 100-200 ASA range, and we generally have to get down into the 320-500 ASA range before they can really be used as a key light in a wider shots. Still photographers can take advantage of strobes or longer shutterspeeds if they want to shoot at a slower ASA.

You might look into small lightweight lights like those made by Lowel. They can be used as hard lights or fitted with Chimeras (or bounced) for softer light.

All this gets into the relationship between cinematography and still photography, which I liken to that of brother and sister -- very closely related, yet fundamentally different!
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#5 Mitch Lusas

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 01:14 AM

I ran across this and figured I would reply with the Strobe Lights I got.

I now own and operate Alien Bees http://www.alienbees.com

These lights are great. They have a fast recycle rate (.5-1.5 seconds), great (and inexpensive) light mods, and they are lite-weight. The back panels have controls that allow for dimming of the lights. Color temperature fluctuates only slightly from 100% and 30%. For cosmetic purposes, you can choose different color shells. This is useful if you want your 320w/s instruments to be Yellow and your 640w/s to be Black.

The Photo cells that spot flashes and fire a sync-flash a fairly sensitive. I've had misfires when using the onboard camera flash, but when synced via a wire to one of the units, I have never had a misfire.

The lights also come packaged with protective shipping dome which is useful for taking the lights on the field.

They are intermediately priced, but much better than InterFit Stellars and the Adorama FlashPoint II's.

If you have any further questions about this unit or other Photography Strobe Units, please don't hesitate to throw me a line.
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#6 David Auner aac

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 03:56 AM

Needless to say, it gets hot. I'm looking to get a lighting kit for photography. If you have any preferences, I'd love to hear about them. Having never messed with this type of lighting, I'm curious and thrilled to try something new.


Hi Mitch,

I know a couple of photographers who use Kinoflos for stills. The only limit is their relatively low light output. So shooting with really high shutter speeds may be a problem. This guy here, e.g. uses Dedos and IIRC Kinos for his stuff. We usually use a Broncolor 4 head flash system with softboxes (very pricey and you can't use it for video/film). I'm planning on using my film lighting stuff for stills as well.

Best regards, Dave

PS: Me love Dedos & Kinoflos ;)
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#7 james smyth

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 10:09 AM

I kinoflows are nice and easy to work with and much safer to handle, but aren't they fairly expensive compared to other lights?
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