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#1 Vas-VGM Studios

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 02:36 PM

Hi guys I am a wedding videographer based in london, im looking to purchase a new camera and need some help
Budget approx £10k
Currently use DSr 250's and have hired Dsr 570 in passed very happy with quality but like the idea of haviing monitor on the side for viewing to make sure white balance is ok
Have looked at DSR 450 DSR 400 JVc GY5100 and many others but seem to be more confused than ever :o
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#2 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 06:31 PM

... Budget approx £10k. Currently use DSr 250's and have hired Dsr 570 in passed very happy with quality but like the idea of haviing monitor on the side for viewing to make sure white balance is ok. Have looked at DSR 450, DSR 400, JVc GY5100 and many others but seem to be more confused than ever :o


The DSR-450WSL 2/3" 16:9/4:3 DVCAM progressive/interlaced camcorder has a built-in color LCD monitor in addition to a hi-res B&W CRT viewfinder, and with a basic lens such as the Canon YJ19x9, it's in your price range:
http://www.creativev...ony_dsr-450wspl

I own the NTSC version of the above package. It's a fabulous camcorder. What questions do you have?
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#3 Vas-VGM Studios

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 07:31 PM

is it a better camera than the dsr 500 and the 390?
How good is the camera under low light conditions?
I Have a JVC GY5100 and not happy with its colour reproduction is the 450 good at colour reproduction?
Is it worth spending the exra money over the 400 just for 16-9 as progressive scan is not usefull for my line of work given that on wedding videos i shhot a great deal of hand held with lots of motion?
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#4 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 27 March 2006 - 08:54 PM

is it a better camera than the dsr 500 and the 390?

The DSR-450WSL is Sony's replacement for the DSR-570, both of which are 2/3" 16:9 3-CCD cams. The newer model isn't "better", but it does have some features the older model didn't: A built-in color LCD video monitor, progressive recording in addition to interlaced, DV and DVCAM recording, and an optional SDI ("live" uncompressed 10-bit 4:2:2 digital video) output card.

How good is the camera under low light conditions?

The DSR-450WSL in interlaced mode has the same sensitivity spec as the DSR-570: f11 at 2000lx. The DSR-390 1/2" 4:3 3-CCD cam's sensitivity is better: f13 at 2000lx. In progressive mode, the DSR-450WSL (like most progressive cams) is about 1-2 stops less sensitive. The DSR-450WSL and DSR-390 have the same -65db S/N spec; the DSR-570 is slightly noisier at -63db.

In actual practice, in interlaced mode I find my DSR-450WSL to be about 1 stop less sensitive than the Sony PD-170, and about the same as a DSR-250. However, the video produced by the DSR-450WSL seems much less noisey than that produced by these 1/3" 3-CCD cams.

I Have a JVC GY5100 and not happy with its colour reproduction is the 450 good at colour reproduction?

I think the DSR-450WSL records great-looking video, and is very adjustable in-camera.

Is it worth spending the exra money over the 400 just for 16-9 as progressive scan is not usefull for my line of work given that on wedding videos i shhot a great deal of hand held with lots of motion?

Many clients, apparently including some wedding video clients, like the look of 16:9 "widescreen" video. The 24p and 30p (or 24p in PAL) modes can be especially beneficial for producing DVDs (less compression for better quality) if your authoring software can take advantage of it.

Any of the above cams are capable of producing good-looking video. I like the flexibility of the DSR-450WSL, and so do my clients. However, only you can determine if its features are appropriate for your productions.
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#5 Vas-VGM Studios

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 10:44 AM

Thank you for your help and for spending time to answer my questions much obliged your a gentleman. :)

Silly question and you may possibly pass me onto another thread but , if im shhoting a wedding on widescreen and want the flexibility of having it viewable on both 4:3 and 16:9 screens is it better to edit footage as a 4:3 project in editing(i use Avid Liquid) so it shows with a crop on a 4;3 monitor , if so will there be any disadvantages in terms of quality loss etc or would i need to produce to versions of a production 1 widescreen and one 4:3 , Silly question but editing widescreen is fairly new to me and im wary of potential pit falls given that some of my clients may still have 4:3 tvs and i dont want picures ofa production to end up looking streached vertically...???
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#6 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 05:02 PM

... if im shhoting a wedding on widescreen and want the flexibility of having it viewable on both 4:3 and 16:9 screens ... some of my clients may still have 4:3 tvs and i dont want picures ofa production to end up looking streached vertically...???

A common solution is to shoot and edit the video and author a DVD in 16:9 (anamorphic) widescreen mode. The camera and editing and DVD authoring software must be capable of generating and properly handling 16:9 anamorphic video.

Most DVD players are correctly configured to play 16:9 anamorphic video so it fills a 16:9 widescreen TV, or letterbox it (put black bars above & below the video) on a 4:3 TV.

Of course, some folks have their DVD players configured incorrectly, in which case there's nothing you can do to force your video to play correctly on their TVs.

Some clients may specify a particular aspect ratio for the final product; in this case you'd typically shoot the original footage in the aspect ratio they require.
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#7 Jac Chesson

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 07:58 PM

I agree with Peter. 16:9 Anamorphic is the way to go. Plus, it gives your product a higher end look and thereby giving you a "leg up" on the competition.

Just make sure you do a test run to make sure your editor and DVD authoring program work well with this.
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#8 Landis Tanaka

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 10:44 PM

fu** that, get a DVX
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#9 Vas-VGM Studios

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 05:10 PM

Recieved the Dsr 450 And used it over the weekend The pictures are Fantastic
it was a pleasure working with such a camera
Does anyone have any settings they wouls like to share ie
gamma adgustments etc for differernt looks
in particular matching it up to a 790 digi or the new 970
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