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Mystery sound equipment, (Well at least to me)


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 03:30 AM

I bought some sound equipment in a package deal that I don't really know what it does. I know this is embarrassing, I should really know what something does before I buy it but I figured it had something to do with old school film production and was worth what I paid for it so here goes.

AKAI Professional S950 Midi sampler with manual

LYNX Time Code Module with LYNX FILM INTERFACE MODULE with both manuals

DOLBY A Type Model 350 ENCODE/Record

DOLBY A Type Model 350 Decode/PB

JL Cooper MIDI MUTE with MIDI Ch 2 Modem

Calzone Case

I read a little about the sampler from the manual and my friend who is a recording artist, told me a few things about it but I'm not sure how it's used in film production. This came from the same place that I got me editing tables from so I thought this could be equipment used in post. Anybody know anything about this stuff?
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#2 Freya Black

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 06:38 AM

AKAI Professional S950 Midi sampler with manual

LYNX Time Code Module with LYNX FILM INTERFACE MODULE with both manuals

DOLBY A Type Model 350 ENCODE/Record

DOLBY A Type Model 350 Decode/PB

JL Cooper MIDI MUTE with MIDI Ch 2 Modem

Calzone Case

I read a little about the sampler from the manual and my friend who is a recording artist, told me a few things about it but I'm not sure how it's used in film production. This came from the same place that I got me editing tables from so I thought this could be equipment used in post. Anybody know anything about this stuff?


The time code module is either a midi time code module or a smpte time code module, either way it is presumably a device for syncing soundtracks to picture. For instance if you had a video recorder with SMPTE output, you could sync it to a computer that would play all the sound tracks in time with it. Not sure how useful that will be to you.

The Sampler is the obviously most useful part, kind of neat, you can use it to create soundtracks for your film, compose music that contains short samples etc. Didn't Peter Gabriel use an S950 on "the last temptation of christ" or something? I forget now.

The Dolby A units are noise reduction units. There is an encoder and a decoder.

They can be used for noise reduction on open reel recordings.

Here is what Dolby say about Dolby A on their site:

Dolby A-type NR
A-type NR, introduced in 1965, was Dolby Laboratories' first innovation. It was originally intended for use by professional recording studios to make quieter master tape recordings. In the early 1970s its use was extended to film studios and motion picture release prints to improve film sound.


So maybe if you were going to make a 35mm film print with optical sound you could use dolby A noise reduction and the cinemas might be able to play it back. *shrug*

love

Freya
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#3 Mitch Gross

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 09:55 PM

Audio post equipment. Really stuff that belongs in a sound sweetening room. Unless you really have a specific use for it or plan to dive into the complex world of high end professional audio, I would try to sell it to someone with a post facility and spend the money on some useful field production audio equipment, such as a field mixer, deck or some wireless mikes. It may also be the case that this is antiquated gear, in which case you may have some attractive doorstops.
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#4 Peter Duggan

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 01:20 AM

Audio post equipment. Really stuff that belongs in a sound sweetening room. Unless you really have a specific use for it or plan to dive into the complex world of high end professional audio, I would try to sell it to someone with a post facility and spend the money on some useful field production audio equipment, such as a field mixer, deck or some wireless mikes. It may also be the case that this is antiquated gear, in which case you may have some attractive doorstops.



Keep the case though. I have a 30 year old Calzone case for my Teac, and it can still survive being hit by a tank.
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#5 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 03:03 AM

I actually wasn't planning on selling any of it. I have lots of doors. But do appriciate getting some info here. I'm starting to get a little better idea of what this stuff does. I'm staying analog with my sound aquistion mainly because of all the responce I had to one of my earlier posts about the Nagras. I ended up buying one and for a while thought about selling it to go digital, but then I re-read that post and from what I gathered even though it's more trouble, analog has better sound quality. This stuff may be useful in an analog situation.

I am actually planning to set up a sound room that would be used for ADR, Foley and Sound effects. I also wanted to put a keyboard and mixer in there. I have a pair of KEM 6 plate editing tables. One with switchable academy standard and cinemascope heads and one with a widescreen head (although the head was damaged in shipping and I have to find a new screen for it.). I want to try to integrate everything into a mini post house. I need to do this cuz nobody in this area has these kind of facilities available there are a few recording studios and small video places but that's it, nothing geared towards film, So I have to build it myself. Anyway that's my plan.
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