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Is there a way of reducing grain in a grade?


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#1 Morgan Peline

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 07:18 AM

Hi,

I'm just about do a final grade on a film I shot last year on 16mm. One of the scenes is very very grainy in parts because we ran out of light and I had to keep shooting on the old '79 Kodak 500T. The last shots I did were 2 to 3 stops underexposed - so as you can imagine they have grain the size of golfballs.

So now what I have is a scene that gets progressively grainier from the wide shots to the mids and CUs. Its a twighlight exterior with no lighting apart from street lights and house lights looking at some houses as three police cars with their headlights on come rushing into frame. There are street lights in shot as well. We will be doing a grade in professional post-production house in Soho.

Any ideas?

I'm thinking of maybe re-transferring that scene darker so that the grain is less obvious but I don't know if it will work or not as I don't actually know how much information is on the negative.

Thanks for the help!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 08:06 AM

Hi,

I'm just about do a final grade on a film I shot last year on 16mm. One of the scenes is very very grainy in parts because we ran out of light and I had to keep shooting on the old '79 Kodak 500T. The last shots I did were 2 to 3 stops underexposed - so as you can imagine they have grain the size of golfballs.

So now what I have is a scene that gets progressively grainier from the wide shots to the mids and CUs. Its a twighlight exterior with no lighting apart from street lights and house lights looking at some houses as three police cars with their headlights on come rushing into frame. There are street lights in shot as well. We will be doing a grade in professional post-production house in Soho.

Any ideas?

I'm thinking of maybe re-transferring that scene darker so that the grain is less obvious but I don't know if it will work or not as I don't actually know how much information is on the negative.

Thanks for the help!


Hi,

I think the best noise reduction would be done in a telecine suite. I would recommend using a Spirit, I am sure the colourist will be able to increase the noise reduction as required.

Stephen
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#3 Alex Haspel

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 11:44 AM

Hi,

I think the best noise reduction would be done in a telecine suite. I would recommend using a Spirit, I am sure the colourist will be able to increase the noise reduction as required.

Stephen



how exactly does a grain reduction like that work? is it comparible to photoshop's gauschian blur?
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#4 David Cox

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 04:51 PM

I agree with Stephen that a good telecine suite should be able to deal with grain quite well. It is very possible that if you are looking at one-light transfers of your 16mm film, that this will be grainier than necessary. This happens because one-light transfers often happen on old telecines and without any grain reduction applied.

Transferring the scene as black-crushed as you can get away with will hide a good deal of grain in your darkest shots.

There are some plug ins (such as from The Foundry) that are able to reduce grain later in post production. This works by analysing changes between frames and deciding that small random pattern changes must be grain. When they work, they're great, but they are very material dependant.

David Cox
Baraka Post Production
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#5 Morgan Peline

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 05:38 PM

At the moment, as far as I have been told, we are only doing the grade from the digiBeta master, which itself derives from a 'best light' technical grade which should be slightly better than a one light. Should I push to get the scene re-transferred from the actual negative?

Thanks!
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