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#1 chantal

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 05:13 PM

Hi, my grandmother recently passed away and while cleaning out her bedroom, I discovered a Kodak XL55, I know it is probably not worth anything, but I would like to see if it still works. I was wondering if anyone could help explain or tell me where I can find instructions on how to use this thing, and how to have the film processed (if need be).


Thank You.
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#2 Clive Tobin

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 09:22 PM

Hi, my grandmother recently passed away and while cleaning out her bedroom, I discovered a Kodak XL55, ...


This is made to shoot 40 or 160 ASA film. If you can find some Kodachrome 40 super-8 you can shoot that and get it processed cheaply through Walmart. The ASA 160 color film is more problematic and you will have to send it off somewhere to get processed. You could shoot Tri-X Reversal black and white film and get it developed through your local motion picture lab such as Forde in Seattle or Film & Video Services in Minneapolis. Labs stock this or you can buy direct from Kodak. The new 64 ASA color film will not be exposed properly in this camera unless you mess around with filters etc.

Otherwise set the filming rate to 18 FPS (not 9) and if using color film set the other switch to the lightbulb symbol if using movie lights, or to the sun symbol if using daylight. If your batteries are good the battery test light will come on when you push the Test button.

Unfortunately these Kodak XL cameras are not reliable, the motor gear being made out of a rubbery plastic (for quiet running) that self destructs without warning.
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#3 chantal

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 01:14 AM

This is made to shoot 40 or 160 ASA film. If you can find some Kodachrome 40 super-8 you can shoot that and get it processed cheaply through Walmart. The ASA 160 color film is more problematic and you will have to send it off somewhere to get processed. You could shoot Tri-X Reversal black and white film and get it developed through your local motion picture lab such as Forde in Seattle or Film & Video Services in Minneapolis. Labs stock this or you can buy direct from Kodak. The new 64 ASA color film will not be exposed properly in this camera unless you mess around with filters etc.

Otherwise set the filming rate to 18 FPS (not 9) and if using color film set the other switch to the lightbulb symbol if using movie lights, or to the sun symbol if using daylight. If your batteries are good the battery test light will come on when you push the Test button.

Unfortunately these Kodak XL cameras are not reliable, the motor gear being made out of a rubbery plastic (for quiet running) that self destructs without warning.



Thank You for this information, but I guess what I really need to know, is how this film is processed? Is it processed onto a cassette tape (VHS)? I am camera illiterate. I also heard that they will be ceasing the production of Super 8 film. Does anyone know if this is true?

Thank You for this information, but I guess what I really need to know, is how this film is processed? Is it processed onto a cassette tape (VHS)? I am camera illiterate. I also heard that they will be ceasing the production of Super 8 film. Does anyone know if this is true?



Sorry, I guess I have one more important thing to ask, what do the buttons do? I mean I cannot find a manual that i can purchase in Canada. I need to know what the "W" and "T" buttons do and so on and so forth. Thank you again.
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 02:28 AM

I found this

XL 55

Year: 72-74

Lens: Ektar 1,2 / 9 - 21 mm

Aerial Focusing

Manual Zoom

Frame rates: 9, 18

Shutter degree: 230

Auto Exposure (Not TTL)

No sound

Made in USA

Manufacturer: Eastman Kodak

Original price in England (in the year of introduction): £121

Recently paid in eBay net auction: $15 eBay7/99 $21 eBay8/99

and this

http://www.photobook...userbk08MC.html

Kodak Movie Cameras
Instruction Manuals

We offer high-quality black and white reprints of the original factory instruction manual. They are first generation, double-sided, trimmed to the format of the original, folded and stapled in the center. Most of the instruction manuals are English language unless otherwise noted. Our catalog prices do not include shipping. Please visit our "How to Order" page.

Kodak XL55 (1973), 29 pages reprint, $10.

Sorry I couldn't find one for free, but 10 bucks ain't too bad.
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#5 chantal

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 04:09 PM

I found this

XL 55

Year: 72-74

Lens: Ektar 1,2 / 9 - 21 mm

Aerial Focusing

Manual Zoom

Frame rates: 9, 18

Shutter degree: 230

Auto Exposure (Not TTL)

No sound

Made in USA

Manufacturer: Eastman Kodak

Original price in England (in the year of introduction): £121

Recently paid in eBay net auction: $15 eBay7/99 $21 eBay8/99

and this

http://www.photobook...userbk08MC.html

Kodak Movie Cameras
Instruction Manuals

We offer high-quality black and white reprints of the original factory instruction manual. They are first generation, double-sided, trimmed to the format of the original, folded and stapled in the center. Most of the instruction manuals are English language unless otherwise noted. Our catalog prices do not include shipping. Please visit our "How to Order" page.

Kodak XL55 (1973), 29 pages reprint, $10.

Sorry I couldn't find one for free, but 10 bucks ain't too bad.



Thank you so much~
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#6 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 06:32 PM

I mean I cannot find a manual that i can purchase in Canada. I need to know what the "W" and "T" buttons do and so on and so forth. Thank you again.


Chantal, you say you are in Canada. Whereabouts? If you are in Toronto I can point you to lots of super 8 resources. If you are elsewhere I may be able to get you started.

Rick

Edited by Rick Palidwor, 02 April 2006 - 06:33 PM.

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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 07:23 PM

I also heard that they will be ceasing the production of Super 8 film. Does anyone know if this is true?


Do you mind sharing how you came to this conclusion?
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#8 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 12:35 AM

Thank you so much~


Te Nada, Amego. Oh and the W & T buttons stand for Wide and Telephoto, They control you the zoom on your lens. I'm not sure about your camera, but mine also has a manual control as well. also they're selling more super 8 film than they have sence the 70's, so there's no sign of it being discontinued as a format, only certain stocks are discontinued which generally are replaced with "better" stocks, although sometimes, that might be debatable as to wether or not they're actually better than the ones they replaced.

Edited by Capt.Video, 03 April 2006 - 12:45 AM.

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#9 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 12:57 AM

only certain stocks are discontinued which generally are replaced with "better" stocks, although sometimes, that might be debatable as to wether or not they're actually better than the ones they replaced.


hehehe...

When I was the number one whiner about the discontinuation of Kodachrome, nobody really had my back and ever publically agreed with me. After I stopped talking about it, slowly but surely many others have now popped up saying what I said at first.

However, without the ultra sophisticated processing that is required to process Kodachrome, the Kodachrome I knew and used from the late 80's was actually better than what I think had been made in the past few years, so in that sense, maybe Kodak's decision was proactive, although both Yale and Spectra would have entertained processing Kodachrome and perhaps processing it to a standard that went out once the Kodak processing machine located in Hollywood was closed down in the late 80's.

I'm still looking forward to anything Kodak does in the Super-8 field, pretty much whatever they release next will signal new growth and improvement for the Super-8 format.
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#10 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 04:17 PM

I actually owned one of these things back in the early 70's as a kid.Only thing I can add is avoid backlit subjects or scenes with heavy contrast.The meter is auto only.
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#11 Robert Hughes

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 05:06 PM

Most Super 8 film (reversal stock) is processed for direct projection from the original film; no copy is needed if you have a Super 8 projector. Most people nowadays transfer their films to video, either cheap off-the-wall DYI or at an expensive telecine suite at a professional post production house. Or somewhere in between. If you have valuable footage that you intend to show to others, go for a good transfer to a capable digital video format such as DVCam and make copies to the video format of your choice.
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#12 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 12:58 AM

Most Super 8 film (reversal stock) is processed for direct projection from the original film; no copy is needed if you have a Super 8 projector. Most people nowadays transfer their films to video, either cheap off-the-wall DYI or at an expensive telecine suite at a professional post production house. Or somewhere in between. If you have valuable footage that you intend to show to others, go for a good transfer to a capable digital video format such as DVCam and make copies to the video format of your choice.



And it's important never to transfer film just to DVD, always go to a tape format prior to going to DVD.
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#13 Maulubekotofa

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 08:23 PM

with the high price o suer 8 film I would not use that camera with anything. Through it away and buy a beter super 8 camera
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#14 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 11:28 PM

Don't throw it away! It was grandmas'! :angry: Buy a new camera and keep this for a conversation piece. :)
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