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Mixing my colour temps


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#1 Jacqueline Donaldson

Jacqueline Donaldson
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Posted 02 April 2006 - 12:23 AM

I'm just surfing the net trying to work out what all the lights are, what output and colour temp, does anyone know of a good website that explains all these, or a good book I can buy.

Also I'm trying to work out how to light this apartment, the director wants if quite warm looking, but the daylight coming is in a little cool, I'm thinking about using some arrilites 800w(3200k) (apartment is small) to light our actors and gelling them maybe just 1/2 or 1/4 CTB, will this look wierd and how can I create a warm glow on the walls, can't gel the windows they are floor to ceiling, huge, can I flood them with something? I want it to look like a warm summer light, but since it's just end of winter here it's kind of a harsh grey.
Maybe I need a 1k just incase?

Thanks

Jac

Or am I better as I'm using the natural day light as my motivation and main source to rent Daylight balances lights and gel some with CTO to create pools of warm colour??

jac
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 12:34 AM

Well, if you want the real overcast daylight coming in to look warm, you shouldn't light the interior with warmer light, you should try and match the daylight and then add overall warmth, either by filtering the camera or timing the image to look warmer. If you light the interior warmer but leave the daylight cool, it will always look cooler in comparison. The only exception is if you have some very powerful tungsten lamps (or HMI's gelled warmer) coming in through the windows to create the effect of warm sunset light spilling into the room, where the mix of cool ambient skylight and orangey "sunlight" would look natural. And with a little smoke (haze) in the air, the warm light would spread more and wash over the frame with this tone, hiding some of the cooler daylight in the background.

Now if all you want is some cosy warmth to the scene as if from warm practical interior sources, then it probably is a good thing that it feels colder outside the windows in comparison.
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#3 Jacqueline Donaldson

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 12:04 AM

Thanks,

I'm going to light for daylight and balancing the cam for that and then add a soft/filter to give a nice glow to the interiors, she wants it kind of glam. Thinking about a warm black pro mist. Haven't shot anything is so many years,that I'm not too confident in making my decisions and there is not really a budget either, so that helped thanks David.

Jac
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#4 Evan Winter

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 02:23 PM

hey david,

i just wanted to say what so many before me have said - you're incredible and never cease to amaze.

i find it so thoughtful, kind, and considerate that you take time to answer questions big and small, difficult and not so difficult.

thank you for your time and your willingness to share knowledge. it is appreciated.

evan winter
www.evanwinter.com
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