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Sunset Question


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 10:09 PM

Last Night I decided to film a sunset sky and it looks like I was rewarded with a spectacular display of yellow, red and orange lights.

In my opinion, the sky and clouds tonight were virtually identical to the sky and clouds last night, yet tonight there was no display of color. I've never managed to be in two spots 5 miles apart at the same time, so I was wondering, how much can where I'm standing relate to whether I see any color in the sky or not?

I'm assuming it's basically impossible to be able to see a full color sky in one spot, yet 4-5 miles away, see nothing at all at the same moment in time, is that a correct assumption to make?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 10:50 PM

The redness depends on the level of particulate matter in the air (smog, dust, smoke, etc.) that causes the shorter wavelengths to be filtered out -- probably it would look similar if seen from a difference of a few miles, but I suppose if you were seeing the sun through a more localized event like a haze from the brushfire, it could look redder depending on your position.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 11:44 PM

The redness depends on the level of particulate matter in the air (smog, dust, smoke, etc.) that causes the shorter wavelengths to be filtered out -- probably it would look similar if seen from a difference of a few miles, but I suppose if you were seeing the sun through a more localized event like a haze from the brushfire, it could look redder depending on your position.


I noticed that clouds form lines or waves, could the angle of the "line" that the cloud is at in relation to the setting sun also affect how much color is reflected? Could a little bit of particulate go a long way if it's angled one way against the sun but if the clouds are angled another way perhaps they don't reflect as much? Would this then add another layer of importance to the angle I choose to be at as compared to the setting sun and the wave of clouds and the particulates? It apparently barely drizzled last night for a very short time, but just a few drops and that was it. So I suppose if it rained more elsewhere that would could have washed out particulate matter from the sky.
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 April 2006 - 05:05 PM

I thought Santo might chime in on this topic, unless perhaps Santo is not allowed out until after the sun sets??? :unsure:
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