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Shooting in extremely hot climates.


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#1 Sam Care

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 02:46 PM

When shooting in an extremely hot climate, what precautions should be taken in terms of maintaining the camera gear? If you are storing the camera in an air conditioned room overnight and then start shooting directly under the sun in the morning, does the camera need time to adjust to the temperature change? Is there any danger of condensation?

Any advice would be much appreciated.
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#2 Mike Kaminski

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 03:30 PM

When shooting in an extremely hot climate, what precautions should be taken in terms of maintaining the camera gear? If you are storing the camera in an air conditioned room overnight and then start shooting directly under the sun in the morning, does the camera need time to adjust to the temperature change? Is there any danger of condensation?

Any advice would be much appreciated.


If its simply air conditioned condensation wont be a problem since air conditioning is only slightly lower than room temperature; the temperature shift shouldnt be too extreme. Climatising equipment usually doesn't take too long though and by the time you get the camera set up and the action blocked it should be fine. You may however get condensation due to sheer humidity if you are for instance shooting in jungle environments, but thats a whole different ballgame. Best thing to do is keep the camera shaded from the sun; a light, white fabric draped over it works nicely to combat heating.
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#3 Peter Emery

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 06:22 PM

If its simply air conditioned condensation wont be a problem since air conditioning is only slightly lower than room temperature; the temperature shift shouldnt be too extreme. Climatising equipment usually doesn't take too long though and by the time you get the camera set up and the action blocked it should be fine. You may however get condensation due to sheer humidity if you are for instance shooting in jungle environments, but thats a whole different ballgame. Best thing to do is keep the camera shaded from the sun; a light, white fabric draped over it works nicely to combat heating.


I worked with an SRIII in Jordan no problems at all. Keep it out the sun. I would say humidity is the only enemy, jungle like conditions can damage a lens for good causing mould which is hard to get rid of.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 09:14 AM

Don't forget to keep the film comfortable too! Avoid letting the film "cook" in the hot sun, or in an area where the temperature can be like an "oven". Refrigeration is usually not necessary, but store the film in an environment where people are comfortable too. In other words, treat film like a member of the crew, and don't do anything to it that would cause "heat damage" to a crew member. ;)
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