Jump to content


Photo

My 1st Reel


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 April 2006 - 10:24 PM

Here is my first cut on my reel. There's some super 8, 16mm, HD and some DV. Let me know your overall impression and what level you think I'm at. I'd really appreciate some Constructive criticism.
thanks
Kirk

Put The video at "Original size" and it looks better.

http://video.google....934522873476864
  • 0

#2 Jamie Metzger

Jamie Metzger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 773 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco

Posted 11 April 2006 - 03:46 AM

Here is my first cut on my reel. There's some super 8, 16mm, HD and some DV. Let me know your overall impression and what level you think I'm at. I'd really appreciate some Constructive criticism.
thanks
Kirk

Put The video at "Original size" and it looks better.

http://video.google....934522873476864


This reel looks like nothing more than you pointing the camera and shooting whatever.

There is no technical expertise, or compositional consideration. I thought it was a home movie and a joke at first.

Appologies to be blunt, but I think you should take a look at other people's reels and step up your shooting a bit.
  • 0

#3 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 April 2006 - 06:45 AM

This reel looks like nothing more than you pointing the camera and shooting whatever.

There is no technical expertise, or compositional consideration. I thought it was a home movie and a joke at first.

Appologies to be blunt, but I think you should take a look at other people's reels and step up your shooting a bit.



I really have to agree. I like some of the kodachrome looking stuff, but for anything other than a skating video it wouldn't fly. The music choice is terrible, very distracting and not supportive to the footage at all. The stuff on the boat is shaky as all hell. The stuff in the apartment is both poorly lit and not really composed to speak of.

I think other than the low budget skating video market, none of this stuff is passable profesionally.
  • 0

#4 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 12 April 2006 - 09:10 PM

thanks guys.
this is exactly what i needed to know. Although i feel like i got kicked in the face, it's exactly the realization i needed. I'm now in the process of re-building everything and taking everyones advice into consideration and this is no industry to get your feelings hurt.

This was made to basically show anything I've done to the faculty at SFSU. I'm in my sophomore year and applying to be in an Advanced Production Pool, where I can take, cinematography, Directing, lighting, Editing etc. for the last two years I've just been in overview courses and shooting on my own time.

thanks,
kirk

so, in your opinion is there anything worth keeping? be honest please.

Edited by Kircules, 12 April 2006 - 09:20 PM.

  • 0

#5 Alex Haspel

Alex Haspel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 282 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • vienna, austria

Posted 17 April 2006 - 09:46 AM

the girl at the end of the reel is hot.
  • 0

#6 fstop

fstop
  • Guests

Posted 20 April 2006 - 06:47 PM

Given your age I think it shows promise. I think if you beaver away, continue refining your technique, reading, learning, absorbing and doing as much freebie work as possible on other peoples shoots as a PA or whatever you can get, in a couple of years your next reel will be an eye opener. Nothing happens overnight and I admire your taking this on the chin, being man about it and willing to keep going.

Along with the above, your next step is to find out what you want to do, is it directing or DPing? What do you want to say? What stories do you want to tell? Are there any? What work stimulates your interest? How much do you want in? What we've seen in this reel is broad and limited- are you genuinely interested in bridges and skaters or are they just easy money shots within walking distance? I thought the blown out kitchen stuff was the most inspired thing on there, and I'd love to see you explore more of that- very interesting visual style given the relatively conservative nature of the rest of the stuff. these are all good starting points to develop.

If the course rejects you this year based on the reel and you still want in bad, keep going. It'll happen eventually. It's all about time. it's worth submitting just to know where you stand, who knows, maybe they'll appreciate your eagerness to shoot and learn. Very early days.
  • 0

#7 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 May 2006 - 11:49 AM

just an update, I re-cut me so called reel and submitted it for school. I got in to the advanced production pool so now i can take cinematography and gripping, etc.
thanks guys, tough love is the hardest to take.
kirk
  • 0

#8 Brian Rose

Brian Rose
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 896 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City area

Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:54 AM

If I can give one tip, it would be this: avoid "camera inside refrigerator shots" like the plague. Of course, there is no rule against this, but I've seen lord knows how many student films that use this technique. It's amateurish, trite, and frankly, lazy.

Yes Tarantino can get away with putting his camera in the trunk of cars, but he is Tarantino. Just don't do it.

Best,
Brian Rose
  • 0

#9 Morgan Peline

Morgan Peline
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 417 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 17 May 2006 - 06:31 PM

Yes Tarantino can get away with putting his camera in the trunk of cars, but he is Tarantino. Just don't do it.


I have to disagree completely. So does that mean that only Tarantino should be allowed to do the shots he feels like doing?

The only reason Tarantino has become 'Tarantino' is because he will shoot what he wants to shoot regardless of what others think, whether or not it's an over-used cliché. 'Kill Bill' is a popular film exactly because of its celebration of filmic clichés. There is no such thing as originality - it's all about how you use the shot within the context of your own film.

My advice would be to learn all the different ways of doing something and then decide what you yourself like or don't like and then devise your own style from personal experience by trying stuff out. And then maybe if you you get lucky enough to become big one day, eventually someone will give the advice to another filmmaker after having told him not to do something:

'Yes Kircules can get away with putting his camera inside a refrigerator, but he is Kircules... Just don't do it.'

Can you see where I'm headed?...

(For your fun: http://filmmaker.com/DUMPS.html)
  • 0

#10 fstop

fstop
  • Guests

Posted 18 May 2006 - 08:55 AM

just an update, I re-cut me so called reel and submitted it for school. I got in to the advanced production pool so now i can take cinematography and gripping, etc.
thanks guys, tough love is the hardest to take.
kirk


EXCELLENT! I told you it was worth a shot. :D
  • 0

#11 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 18 May 2006 - 10:36 AM

just an update, I re-cut me so called reel and submitted it for school. I got in to the advanced production pool so now i can take cinematography and gripping, etc.
thanks guys, tough love is the hardest to take.
kirk


Yay! :)

I saw your short film matchless somewhere and I kind of liked that, although the telecine was dreadful and the framing seemed a fair bit out in some of the shots, it was still a film that had a really good feel to it and I kind of liked the strange magical kind of storyline. I think you should keep that one and maybe even someday get a decent telecine done because it will be fun to look back on in the future! :)

love

Freya
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Opal

Technodolly

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

CineLab