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Advantages of HD transfer


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#1 Evan Warner

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 01:59 AM

Hey guys,

I know there have been a number of posts similar to this but none has quite covered what I am lookign for. We have shoot regular 16mm and edited our final cut on a stienback in the old cut and tape method ( really makes you think about decisions). From our workprint we had a negcut done and then a paliminary telecine of our first MOS anwser print so that we can do sound design and eventually sound mix at the sound house using protools. After that we have our sound sent to LA to get an optical track put on our print. This means that our final output is 16mm film for festivals and such. Of course we will also want a digital copy for distribution. What I am wondering is this, on a limited film student budget, does it make any sense to do our final telecine to HD rather than SD?

Here are my thoughts

HD will have a better resolution and will be better for theatrical release however we will already have a 16mm print for that purpose.

HD won't make a difference if we are going to output to SD DVD anyway?

The lab we are dealing with does not do direct to HD transfers. They will only go to various HD tape formats. Perhaps they could then upload that to a harddrive for use but that would cost I imagine. Otherwsie we would have to rent a HD deck with I hear is very expensive.

With all of these factors in mind do you guys see any reason to go HD or would a DigiBeta be fine? We also don't have a Digibeta deck so the same thing as HD would apply here but I am assuming it is less expensive.

What are your thoughts?

Cheers
Evan
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#2 Canney

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 02:51 PM

HD acts more like film does in post production and picks up more resolution of the film and picture quality and color than SD ever could. But film converted to HD down converted to SD looks better than film converted directly to SD. This of course is my opinion developed thorugh work experience. Yet If your strapped for cash and are going to do the final to SD anyways might ass well go for SD from the get go.

Edited by Canney, 16 April 2006 - 02:51 PM.

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#3 shrapnel72

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 08:43 PM

I've never used DigiBeta, but I know that HD looks WAY better than DV-25 when outputting to SD DVD. DVD's made from an HD master look awesome, very close to professional feature-film DVDs, which when played on an HDTV render stunning detail and colors, in my opinion. Also, eventually you'll have 1080p HD DVDs and then you'll really be glad to have the HD masters.
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#4 Canney

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 08:24 PM

Actually you can use HD DVD's on any apple computer. But the only thing is you feature in 16:9 or 4:3. If it 4:3 you sould do the SD transfer but if its 16:9 go for the HD. I suggest this cause of the whole ratio native format thing. But HD compared to SD does look better yes.
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#5 Joshua Reis

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 09:50 PM

If you shot 4:3 standard 16mm, then doing a Standard definition Digibeta transfer on a Spirit 2k would probably be your most reasonable solution. If you want a great looking DVD, but sure to a professional 23.98 pregressive encode. You would be surpised at how good your film will look on a progresive scan display, even when it is upresed since it is progressive.
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