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What filters does everyone use when shooting dramas?


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#1 Morgan Peline

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 05:12 AM

Hi,

I just shot a short on a HDCAM a month or so ago. I used the 1/4 white promist (in 25P mode with the cine gamma). When shooting digital, be it professional or even miniDV, I always tend to use a 1/4 promist as matter of course.

I'm may be shooting another short on HDCAM soon and was considering doing something different in terms of filters - I might even shoot without any kind of 'softening' filter.

Out of curiosity, I was wondering what other filters other camerapeople use when shooting digital and why.

Thanks.
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#2 Clive North

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 11:50 AM

Hi,

I just shot a short on a HDCAM a month or so ago. I used the 1/4 white promist (in 25P mode with the cine gamma). When shooting digital, be it professional or even miniDV, I always tend to use a 1/4 promist as matter of course.

I'm may be shooting another short on HDCAM soon and was considering doing something different in terms of filters - I might even shoot without any kind of 'softening' filter.

Out of curiosity, I was wondering what other filters other camerapeople use when shooting digital and why.

Thanks.



I'm finding that when shooting progressive on HDCam - a little filtration goes a very long way. Compared with shooting say DigiBeta and using an 1/8 or 1/4 ProMist to 'take the video edge' off the picture, shooting HDCam in progressive mode with a film gamma should provide all the 'softness' one needs.
Anything else can be taken care of in the grade.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 01:55 PM

I've alternated from either an approach where I use a #1/8 ProMist on almost everything except extreme long shots, or where I shoot unfiltered except for tight close-ups where I add a #1/2 Soft-FX.

Sometimes I mix it up a bit though, like combine a #1/8 ProMist and #1/2 Soft-FX, or jump to a #1/4 ProMist or #1 Soft-FX for a special scene.

I've been curious to try the #1 & #2 GlimmerGlass for an HD production.

If you're planning on a transfer to 35mm, there is some softening to expect (or in reality, just that you have to plan for the lower rez of HD compared to 35mm to become more obvious on the big screen) so you want to keep diffusion to a minimum.
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 01:03 AM

If you're planning on a transfer to 35mm, there is some softening to expect (or in reality, just that you have to plan for the lower rez of HD compared to 35mm to become more obvious on the big screen) so you want to keep diffusion to a minimum.


Even when downconverted to SD it retains a softness that's unlike 35mm (maybe due to the downconversion process). Either way I prefer as sharp an image as possible with HD, and introduce an "optical quality" if need be with something like a 1/8 WPM, or a low-grade Ultracon. Nothing that softens too much though.
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#5 Lars.Erik

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 01:20 AM

I like the look of UltraContrast, but they will give you hell if you get any sort of flaring.

David, what's GlimmerGlass?


LarsE
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 04:40 AM

I shot a short that has been transferred to 35mm using the Cinevator. The 35mm print had a soft look (rather like Super 16 without grain), so I wouldn't want to add diffusion when using the Cinevator, unless I wanted to create an effect in the highlights. I had the detail switched off on the F900 and no filters.

BTW Nice looking pictures if you need a few 35mm prints without the cost of a DI. The B & W titles were sharp looking.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 11:50 AM

GlimmerGlass is a Tiffen filter similar to ProMist.
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#8 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 10:45 PM

hi,
I like to use really heavy diffusion for some special looks but i cranck in camera so much the gamma and black levels that the diffusion goes away but still leaves a softer edge. Interesting look specially when there is a lot of light. a lot front light.
Miguel
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#9 Emanuel Schwermer, bvk

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 11:36 AM

I use Tiffen Black Diffusion FX on almost every HD shooting with actors involved.
The BDFX2 is realy nice for close up´s to gain a in focus diffusion.
I really like them.
But always hard to discuss about filters, not really objective.
Cheers,

Emanuel
Operator/1st AC/ DIT
Munich-Germany
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