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nizo filter switch and ektachrome 64 problems?


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#1 grantsmith

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 07:26 PM

Hello, Any help on this would be very appreciated.

Firstly I have just bought a Nizo 156xl. The problem I have is with the filter switch. If I am using daylight balanced film, do I switch it to the sun symbol? Will I have to use a seperate light meter for ectachrome 64 or can I use the built in one? If I use the inbuilt one should I zoom in on what I want to expose on - i.e. a face highlight, note the reading on the meter, change to manual exposure and use this reading? Many thanks
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#2 Victor Mejia

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 07:33 PM

Hello, Any help on this would be very appreciated.

Firstly I have just bought a Nizo 156xl. The problem I have is with the filter switch. If I am using daylight balanced film, do I switch it to the sun symbol? Will I have to use a seperate light meter for ectachrome 64 or can I use the built in one? If I use the inbuilt one should I zoom in on what I want to expose on - i.e. a face highlight, note the reading on the meter, change to manual exposure and use this reading? Many thanks


I have a Nizo S800, so I'm assuming the filter switch on your camera is the same as mine. If you shoot daylight balanced film DON"T switch the filter to the sun symbol. Keep the filter on the light bulb symbol. These cameras were designed to shoot Tungsten balanced film, so switching to the sun symbol will activate the filter that is meant for Tungsten film. On the light bulb symbol there is no filter, so keep it there. Make sense?

Edited by yolia, 13 April 2006 - 07:36 PM.

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#3 grantsmith

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 08:01 PM

I have a Nizo S800, so I'm assuming the filter switch on your camera is the same as mine. If you shoot daylight balanced film DON"T switch the filter to the sun symbol. Keep the filter on the light bulb symbol. These cameras were designed to shoot Tungsten balanced film, so switching to the sun symbol will activate the filter that is meant for Tungsten film. On the light bulb symbol there is no filter, so keep it there. Make sense?



Brilliant. I thought that may have been the way to do it but I didnt want to take the risk of trying. I take it this is the setting for shooting b+w too? Thanks!
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#4 Victor Mejia

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 09:49 PM

Brilliant. I thought that may have been the way to do it but I didnt want to take the risk of trying. I take it this is the setting for shooting b+w too? Thanks!


Yes. Light bulb symbol for B+W film.
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#5 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 11:57 PM

The problem I have is with the filter switch. If I am using daylight balanced film, do I switch it to the sun symbol? Will I have to use a seperate light meter for ectachrome 64 or can I use the built in one?


Your Nizo will correctly read the 64 film with the internal meter.

To be clear, though, the 64 film you refer to is most likely 64T, which is a Tungsten balanced film, so you want to engage the filter if shooting under day light.

If you are shooting truly daylight balanced film (not a lot of it in supe r8), then you don't engage the built-in filter, as others advised, BUT if you are shooting under tungsten light you want to add a blue (80) filter.

Rick
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#6 Bryan Darling

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 01:18 AM

I use a Nizo 2056, my understanding is that you use the daylight(sun)/tungsten(lightbulb) switch for whatever environment you're in and that the camera will engage the filter when needed as it reads the film cartridge to determing if it's daylight or tungsten film and if the filter should be engaged.

As for example when I've shot Kodachrome in daylight and put the switch on the sun, the meter showed a need to open up more, going from 40ASA to 25ASA. However when using tungsten light and the switch was on the lightbulb the meter changed again. So that's how you can tell how the camera is acting to the switch positions.

When doing black and white I also use the switch as the ASA lowers going from daylight to tungsten. I've shot many a roll of film and everything has come out just fine. Hopefully that helps.
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