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glossy lighting!


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#1 rajavel

rajavel
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Posted 14 April 2006 - 12:47 AM

hi all
it was easy for me to do a contrast lighting for my last film ...which luckily required that mood for that particular script. now am on to the next film which requires just the oppposite....a very glossy and colourful image is what it requires throughout the film. i am afraid of doing a flat lighting ...which i hate to do...at the same time i feel its very much a thin line between flat and glossy lighting. can anyone or all of u give me some tips on getting that look in terms of lighting. (diffused soft light, light ratio, backlight...and background light, filters, ambience and artiste light incase of interiors....anything at all). the director wants a very very colourful film.....moulded light for the lead roles. how all can i achieve it? can i try something in the film processing technique to achieve rich colours.

thanks
raj

its me again....kindly suggest stocks too...if that can make a hell of an enhancement.
thanks
raj
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#2 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
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Posted 14 April 2006 - 08:20 PM

Color and contrast tend to compete with each other visually, so usually if you want to highlight one you tone down the other. But that doesn't have to be absolute.

Frontal lighting can help by minimizing contrast from modeling, and evenly illuminate colored surfaces. Softening that frontal light will take the harshness off the shadows that are present, minimizing contrast even more. This is essentially the glamour/fashion look you see in music videos and cosmetic commercials.

"Frontal" lighting doesn't always have to be "flat" lighting though, although modeling is diminished. "Flat" lighting indicates that the illumination is fairly soft and even from ALL directions, whereas frontal lighting can be selective and still allow shadows and contrast in some parts of the frame. For example, it's not uncommon to have a frontal "beauty" light on an actress' face in closeup, while the rest of the scene is lit more contrasty. You might also simply bring the key light around a little more frontal than usual while still keeping a moderate key/fill ratio.

Of course the easiest way to get a colorful image is to put colorful subjects in front of the camera. Production design and wardrobe with lots of color can go a long way even with "normal" lighting and filmstocks.

There are lots of ways to boost the color on film or digital, depending on the look you want. Stock choice and processing techniques depend on the look you're going for.

I think you'd be best served by finding films and other images that have the color and contrast quality you and the director want, and then break down the techniques those images used to get there.
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