Jump to content


Photo

Returning back to work after injury.


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 15 April 2006 - 09:38 AM

Hi,

At the begining of Febuary I had a bike accident and broke my collar bone, and have subsequently been resting to allow it to heal, and it should have healed but hasn't properly.

Last week I started on a digi-beta shoot, it was my first film job of the year and found my self embarrisingly rusty, I didn't feel alert and was making mistakes on stupid things for instance on putting in an end-board. The camera operator was very vocal about this shouting it out infront of the rest of the crew, I found this very embarrasing. In a few hours I had enough, I was in a lot of pain from my shoulder from lifting equipment and asked to leave, which they let me do immediatly.

The short experience made me feel very appathetic towards production which i've never felt before.

Has anyone else got similiar experiences like this? Is this to be expected?
  • 0

#2 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 15 April 2006 - 10:10 AM

hey Andy,

Sorry to here about your experience. Did the camera operator know that you had been off for awihle due to severe injury? If he did he is an ass. I would still consider him an ass for berating you publicly in front of other members of the crew even if he did not know.

If you had been on one of my jobs and I knew you were coming off an injury like that I would encourage you to take it easy and slowly get warmed up to see if you feel OK. Even if I did not know about it, if you had done something wrong I would quietly mention it, or just tell the AD's we had a camera problem and need to do it again.

But some people in this business feel the need to yell, scream and to blame others.

If you are a decent hardworking guy and the other members of the crew know that, then the guy screaming looks like the ass.

It is also normal to be a little rusty after some time off. Don't let it get to you and return to work when you feel a little stronger.

Better yet, use the time off to explore other options. A friend of mine who was an assistant fractured a vertibra a few years ago and couldn't do AC work for 6 months. He used the time to explore video post prodcution and now he is a colorist with aspirations to start doing DI color correction. He has a steady job (as opposed to freelancing) and loves the work.

Best

Tim
  • 0

#3 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 April 2006 - 11:17 AM

If the specific activities you're being asked to do exacerbate your injury, then you're going to have to either take more time off to heal, or be able to modify and be in control of what physical demands are being made of you on the set. Your coworkers should be understanding, unless they are being put into a position that they literally can't afford to compensate for your incapacity, which of course still doesn't give them license to treat you with disrespect. Your health is more important than any shoot.
  • 0

#4 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 15 April 2006 - 06:55 PM

I sprained my ankle back in October and was down for about a month. I let all my clients know my status, and when I did start taking jobs again I let them know at the beginning of the day that I wasn't 100%. I let them know what they could and could not expect me to be able to do (no running, for instance).

But I also wouldn't take a job if I didn't feel I could deliver what the client needed of me. For instance doing handheld for a straight 10 hr. day was out of the question, but mixed production with standing for 20 minute intervals was okay.

It does make you appreciate how much you rely on your physical fitness for your job. You have to heal properly or you're going to be COMPLETELY out of work...
  • 0

#5 Rik Andino

Rik Andino
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 783 posts
  • Electrician
  • New York City

Posted 16 April 2006 - 02:52 AM

Your health is more important than any shoot.


I know folks who would argue that claim...
This business is filled with lots of selfish bastards.
That's why you gotta take care of yourself.
  • 0

#6 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 16 April 2006 - 03:33 AM

Last week I started on a digi-beta shoot, it was my first film job of the year and found my self embarrisingly rusty, I didn't feel alert and was making mistakes on stupid things for instance on putting in an end-board. The camera operator was very vocal about this shouting it out infront of the rest of the crew, I found this very embarrasing. In a few hours I had enough, I was in a lot of pain from my shoulder from lifting equipment and asked to leave, which they let me do immediatly.

The short experience made me feel very appathetic towards production which i've never felt before.

Has anyone else got similiar experiences like this? Is this to be expected?


Maybe you're apathetic at the thought of working with that camera operator again, I'll refrain from calling him a name but what a.
  • 0

#7 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 18 April 2006 - 07:34 AM

Did the camera operator know that you had been off for awihle due to severe injury?


He knew that I had been off due to an injury, but its easy to overlook these things if you don't know details. I honestly think he meant well, he knew I was fairly new to video and was keen to teach me, but he was a naturally loud person, so was vocale about most things which in a way can be a good quality to have.

Its very possible that I was being overly-sensitive as I was dissappointed with my own form, but I would have preffered had his words of wisdom stayed with-in the camera dept. as they normally do. My errors didn't affect the shoot in any way, but were more lapses in form/etiquet.

The pain factor was probably caused when collecting the camera equipment with the AD the day before, news that the gaffer had dropped out had arrived so we also had to load a hefty lighitng kit as well, plus unload it at the location and move them about for the first shot till the replacement gaffer turned up. - It was obviously too much a little too soon.

Better yet, use the time off to explore other options. A friend of mine who was an assistant fractured a vertibra a few years ago and couldn't do AC work for 6 months. He used the time to explore video post prodcution and now he is a colorist with aspirations to start doing DI color correction. He has a steady job (as opposed to freelancing) and loves the work.


This looks like particularly good advise right now, it looks like i'm gonna have to have an operation on it, well actually two opperations so it looks like i'm going to be 'recovering' for qutie a bit longer, so considering a different direction may be a good idea.

I know folks who would argue that claim...
This business is filled with lots of selfish bastards.
That's why you gotta take care of yourself.


Yea, I think its really important in a camera dept. to be physically fit and healthy as so much is lifting and carrying, sometimes in uncomfortable and inhospitable locations, unforntunatly the lifestyle of production doesn't always allow healthy eating, exercise, or even yoga (recommended by a Gaffer on that shoot)...


Cheers for all the advise everyone, its given me something to think about,

Many thanks Andy
  • 0

#8 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 30 April 2006 - 08:25 AM

Sorry to reawaken a dead thread.... but I need to ask a question.

The doctor wants to operate on my collar-bone, but says the decision its up to me, and says I should consider my career needs as the decisive factor (and not vanity).

Does anybody know of camera assistants, grips or gaffers who have experienced clavicle breakages or similar injuries, and coped without surgery? Have they managed with the physical aspects of the job - lifting etc...?
  • 0

#9 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11947 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 April 2006 - 01:48 PM

Hi,

I do know someone who broke a collarbone riding horses. She still rides horses and it looks fairly un-operated-on, jutting out rather disconcertingly beneath the skin. Doesn't seem to bother her. I could ask.

Phil
  • 0

#10 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 30 April 2006 - 02:05 PM

Sorry to reawaken a dead thread.... but I need to ask a question.

The doctor wants to operate on my collar-bone, but says the decision its up to me, and says I should consider my career needs as the decisive factor (and not vanity).

Does anybody know of camera assistants, grips or gaffers who have experienced clavicle breakages or similar injuries, and coped without surgery? Have they managed with the physical aspects of the job - lifting etc...?



My personal opinion is there is no such thing as a dead thread unless it is locked by the moderator. If nobody occasionally reawakened a "dead thread" these forums would be mere chat rooms and once something fell off of page one it would be gone forever.
  • 0

#11 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 02 May 2006 - 03:21 AM

it looks fairly un-operated-on, jutting out rather disconcertingly beneath the skin.


Yea thats quite common, many rugby players have it, even though it doesn't look pretty its still supposedly healed.

The problem comes when the bone doesn't heal, and remains loose, thats why the doctor wants to operate because he believes it will affect my strength, something which he's worried will affect my career.
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

The Slider

Opal

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly