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#1 SSJR

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 08:21 AM

Can anyone please explain methods they have used to make their film-stock look like technicolor from the late 60s? Wether it can be done in the telecine or by printing a certain way to get that amazing look?

If you have stills that would be amazing!

Thanks
Evan
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#2 Steve Wallace

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 11:12 AM

Can anyone please explain methods they have used to make their film-stock look like technicolor from the late 60s? Wether it can be done in the telecine or by printing a certain way to get that amazing look?

If you have stills that would be amazing!

Thanks
Evan


Here is vague overview of process Scorsese used in the Aviator. Some will argue it really doesn't look like Technicolor (and I'm inclined to agree), but nonetheless they did pull off a great look for the film reminisant of the old Technicolor films.

http://www.aviatorvf...erview&id=color
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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 01:11 PM

Can anyone please explain methods they have used to make their film-stock look like technicolor from the late 60s? Wether it can be done in the telecine or by printing a certain way to get that amazing look?

If you have stills that would be amazing!

Thanks
Evan

Art Direction was a VERY large part of the "Technicolor" look. What many classic films with the Technicolor look had was Art and Color Stylists that were astoundingly talented. For instance: "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" has a gorgeous pastel palette that was determined by Mary Blair. Who was Mary Blair? She was Walt Disney's favorite Color Stylist for many of the classic Disney animated films. Technicolor was the technical medium by which many great films were made but without the incredible talent that produced the "look" of those films, I doubt if in 2005 we'd all be getting weepy eyed at the thought of making a film as beautiful.

From IMDB:

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967) (color designer)
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (1958) (color stylist)
Lake Titicaca (1955) (color and styling)
Peter Pan (1953) (color and styling)
Alice in Wonderland (1951) (color and styling)
Cinderella (1950) (color and styling)
Johnny Appleseed (1948) (color stylist)
Melody Time (1948) (color and styling)
Song of the South (1946) (color stylist)
The Three Caballeros (1944) (art supervisor)
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#4 Filip Plesha

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 01:27 PM

If you take a look at exterior scenes from some old technicolor movies, shots of ordinary things, you'll see that technicolor really didn't look that spectacular, but rather the sets and light were spectacular.
I mean, it looks nice and full, but not to that extend to which the studio shots looked like.
And one other things proves this observation: in 50's eastmancolor films didn't look much different than technicolor films from early 50's, proves that 90% of it was in what was in front of the camera.
Take a look at "There's no bussiness like show bussiness" on DVD, its a film shot on color neg and processed at deluxe, it really has nothing to do with technicolor, and still has that classic technicolor glow.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 01:27 PM

3-strip Technicolor was obsolete by 1955. In the 1960's most productions would have been using 35mm Eastmancolor (Kodak color negative), 50 ASA and then a 100 ASA stock by 1968.

So what you're responding to is mainly art direction and lighting in terms of the level of color saturation, combined with the fact that many releases used Technicolor's dye transfer printing process until the mid 1970's. Probably Kodak's Vision Premier print stock (2393) comes closest to that look, but I'd start with art direction and lighting, using slow film stock and bigger lights.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 10:59 AM

I agree, much of the classic "Technicolor Look" was lighting, set design and costuming. Today, any of the normal contrast VISION2 color negative films is a good starting point. Using Kodak VISION Premier Color Print Film 2393 will give added tone scale and color gamut in your 35mm or 70mm release prints:

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.8.4.5&lc=en

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