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16mm Ektachrome


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#1 Keneu Luca

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 01:22 PM

Ektachrome
16mm

copyright on the can is 2002

No expiration date.

Stored in a room approx 40 -60 degrees all this time.

What do ya think?

Yes, Iwill test it first, but what do ya think?

Thank you
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#2 Keneu Luca

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 07:20 AM

Lil' bump.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 12:13 PM

Ektachrome
16mm

copyright on the can is 2002

No expiration date.

Stored in a room approx 40 -60 degrees all this time.

What do ya think?

Yes, Iwill test it first, but what do ya think?

Thank you


Which EKTACHROME film? Four year old film stored at cool temperature will likely be useable, but may show some loss of D-Max ("milky" blacks) and speed, along with some increased graininess. You are correct, a test would be a good idea.
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#4 Canney

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 08:13 PM

Test it definetlly. I have found old ektacrhome to have runny color, usually in the reds for me and sometimes grainny. I usually filter it out throught telecine whitebalancing. But yeah test a roll for sure.
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#5 Keneu Luca

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 02:25 PM

The stock is 7239.

I've never heard of such a thing, but if you tell the lab that the film is 4 years old, is there anything they can do different that might increase the chances of the film being developed......ummmm...normally?

I know, probably not. The question seems really stupid now that I've just typed it. But there are no such things as stupid questions, just stupid people.

Edited by Keneu, 22 April 2006 - 02:29 PM.

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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 09:07 AM

In general, avoid underexposing or push-processing films that may be suffering the effects of old age.

Although labs can make chemical adjustments to a process to reduce fog levels (antifoggants, increased bromide), these additions would make the process non-standard, and would not likely be used to compensate for a few rolls of a customer's over-aged film.
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#7 Canney

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 07:19 PM

Alright I have been doing some various aged film. From new to 25+ years old. I did some refriged 3 years beyond the date old ektachrome and it came very runny in the reds. My suggestion is to find some newer stock seriously.
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#8 Keneu Luca

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 07:52 AM

I finally tested the film.

Perfect.

The film was absolutely flawless.

I realize I got lucky.

But despite my luck, I probably wont take chances anymore. I just couldnt help it - I saw a good deal and jumed on it. Some of you may have seen the auctions on ebay - this guy has been unloading cases of 7239. I now wish I bid on all of them. There were at least 3 separate auctions for cases of several 400' rolls.

But yeah...I got lucky.

Edited by Keneu, 12 June 2006 - 07:55 AM.

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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 11:48 AM

I'm surprised you could still find a lab that was processing VNF.
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#10 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 02:22 PM

I'm surprised you could still find a lab that was processing VNF.


A few labs still are running VNF-1, and Kodak still stocks the chemistry. But yes, most are in the process of moving to E-6 as remaining stocks of the VNF films are depleted.
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#11 Keneu Luca

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 03:07 PM

A1 Film Lab in New York.

http://www.a1filmlab.com/
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#12 Jonathan Rotberg

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 01:21 PM

A few labs still are running VNF-1, and Kodak still stocks the chemistry. But yes, most are in the process of moving to E-6 as remaining stocks of the VNF films are depleted.



Can you process that Ektochrome with E-6. That is cross processing right and gives a totally different look than using VNF?
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#13 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 02:33 PM

Can you process that Ektochrome with E-6. That is cross processing right and gives a totally different look than using VNF?


The E-6 and VNF-1 processes are similar, and will both produce an image with a modern color reversal film, but "cross processing" will likely result in unpredictable differences in color or tone scale.
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#14 Jonathan Rotberg

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 03:09 PM

The E-6 and VNF-1 processes are similar, and will both produce an image with a modern color reversal film, but "cross processing" will likely result in unpredictable differences in color or tone scale.



Great. VNF is being phased out along with this stock correct? But E-6 is still carried by all processors who process color reversal correct?

thanks for your help,

jonathan
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#15 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 05:20 PM

The stock is 7239.

I've never heard of such a thing, but if you tell the lab that the film is 4 years old, is there anything they can do different that might increase the chances of the film being developed......ummmm...normally?

I know, probably not. The question seems really stupid now that I've just typed it. But there are no such things as stupid questions, just stupid people.


Not worry too much.
I don't know, how many films you have.
If you have a few 400 ft rolls with similar number of emulsion, this can be use.
You need take short end of your film ( 1..2 m ), go to processing lab and order test of film ( sensitometric test).
The lab tell you real speed of film and other characteristics of film.
You will know real date of manufacturing of film from Dx code, because, DX code will show you real date of film manufacturing.

You can make simple test too.
You need shoot a few test shots of Kodak color scale and Kodak grey scale with difference aperture. ( set speed of film on exposure meter 160 ASA, 100 ASA, 80ASA, 64 ASA. 50 ASA, 40 ASA, 32ASA, 20 ASA).
After processing, you need choose better test shots. And you will know, what final speed have your film and what speed need use for shooting.

I don't know, but, from my experience with color negative and color reversal films, the 3 years old film lost near 50 % of speed.

I will glad to know opinion of other filmmakers about use of old stock of film.
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#16 Keneu Luca

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 09:32 PM

Not worry too much.
I don't know, how many films you have.
If you have a few 400 ft rolls with similar number of emulsion, this can be use.
You need take short end of your film ( 1..2 m ), go to processing lab and order test of film ( sensitometric test).
The lab tell you real speed of film and other characteristics of film.
You will know real date of manufacturing of film from Dx code, because, DX code will show you real date of film manufacturing.

You can make simple test too.
You need shoot a few test shots of Kodak color scale and Kodak grey scale with difference aperture. ( set speed of film on exposure meter 160 ASA, 100 ASA, 80ASA, 64 ASA. 50 ASA, 40 ASA, 32ASA, 20 ASA).
After processing, you need choose better test shots. And you will know, what final speed have your film and what speed need use for shooting.

I don't know, but, from my experience with color negative and color reversal films, the 3 years old film lost near 50 % of speed.

I will glad to know opinion of other filmmakers about use of old stock of film.

Thanks Olex. But I did shoot the film already; you must have missed my update. The footage came out beautiful.

Edited by Keneu, 06 July 2006 - 09:33 PM.

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#17 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 07 July 2006 - 10:55 AM

Great. VNF is being phased out along with this stock correct? But E-6 is still carried by all processors who process color reversal correct?

thanks for your help,

jonathan


You need to check with your lab to verify which process they are using. VNF-1 processing is still available at some labs, others have converted to E-6.
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