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Lighting by the HD/SDI output


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#1 NAH

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 03:53 PM

I was told using the HD/SDI output on the Viper I could judge my lighting off the monitor and it would be accurate. Since this output isn't 4:4:4 I am skeptical that it will be a good representative of the image. Has anyone else done this?

thanx
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#2 Mike Brennan

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 04:21 AM

I was told using the HD/SDI output on the Viper I could judge my lighting off the monitor and it would be accurate. Since this output isn't 4:4:4 I am skeptical that it will be a good representative of the image. Has anyone else done this?

thanx


Will you be shooting filmstream? If so....

It requires a period of adjustment/experience to make judgements of uncorrected filmstream on a monitor.

The camera also outputs an internal processing of ccd signal to video which is a little "course" out of the box.

Lookup tables are available by cintel and ecinema for live conversion of filmstream.

Zebra is accurate means of indicating ccd saturation

Combination of the above techniques delivers results. Monitoring shadow detail is the tricky part.


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#3 Quenell Jones

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 10:32 PM

Yes, its still a good indication for judging your lighting....because if you break down the 4:4:4 signal....its a representation of RGB or actually Luminace/G - R - B signal....so when you are looking at the HD/SDI big 24" monitor the only thing that you are loosing is 0 - 2 - 2 or some color pixles of the red and blue, considering the fact that the human eye can judge shifts in contrast better/quicker than that of saturation.....you will be fine...
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#4 Michael Collier

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 11:13 PM

The way I have always worked with lighting for video was with a waveform. Vectroscopes are nice, but I only use them if I can rent or borrow one that is built into one unit, otherwise its too much hassle for really very little benefit.

You can judge just about everything by eye except the highlights. Usually these crush to near white, and its hard to discern on set if you have detail in the highlights or not. They just look white. If you have a waveform you can set everything else by eye and by looking at the waveform know weather a window will be soft white with a little detail, or if it has gone nuclear outside. Also you can make other informed decisions about blacks and shadow areas with precision.

I have always done smaller projects however, never with something as nice as a Viper, but in principle its the same. And I would imagine you can find a good HD-SDI waveforms cheap. at NAB this year there was one that is about the size of a large PDA and has all power internal (easier to set up etc.) I have always wanted to see if it was possible to get one in a wireless mode, so you can carry it on you like a lightmeter.

Edited by Michael Collier, 12 August 2006 - 11:15 PM.

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