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Color Readings On Black & White Film


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#1 gogetmagog

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 04:38 PM

Is there a resource somewhere with a chart of how the basic ROYGBIV colors translate on black and white film? And also how color filters will effect these color readings? Thank you -kt
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 07:31 PM

Is there a resource somewhere with a chart of how the basic ROYGBIV colors translate on black and white film? And also how color filters will effect these color readings? Thank you -kt

if they are all at the same intensity, they should all result in the same shade of grey! Various films do have slightly different sensitivites particularly in the red and blue ends of the spectrum.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 10:12 PM

if they are all at the same intensity, they should all result in the same shade of grey! Various films do have slightly different sensitivites particularly in the red and blue ends of the spectrum.



Charles' is really the right answer. There are also complications, though.

The same measured intensity of all of the colors will actually look like different intensities to your eyes. The percieved intensity of colors even depends on the ambient light levels around them, so it's a very tricky thing to put in hard and fast rules.

As for filters, they will darken the areas of complimentary color(s). This is because the filter allows the color of the filter to pass through while filtering out the complimentary color(s). Combine this effect with the usual need to open up a little and the percieved effect is to brighten the color of the filter and darken ther compliments.

You really just need to do it and experience the effects yourself.

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 20 April 2006 - 10:13 PM.

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#4 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 02:44 AM

This is the theory of panchromatic film. differences in color temperature of the lighting used as well as lens coatings influence things as well. A bit of testing is something you will benefit from.
A still camera and some filters would be an economical way to do this. Take notes!
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