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what makes film pushable?


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#1 Daniel Madsen

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:52 PM

I read in another forum that 7245 doesn't push very well. What about a stock makes it pushable/ not pushable. Grain structure?


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Dan
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#2 Mike Rizos

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 09:10 PM

Hi, I would think that, since you're underexposing, underexposure laditude would make a film exceptable to push. Since you're not really changing the film speed no matter what ASA you rate it, films that take underexposure well would be ok to push. Extended development simply brings out some of the shadow detail that might not have been there through normal development. The price for this is "increase" in film speed is higher contrast and bigger grain.
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#3 stephen lamb

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 11:41 AM

Pusing also increases color saturation doesn't it?
Steve
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 11:51 AM

Pusing also increases color saturation doesn't it?
Steve

Hi no it doesnt , it desaturates colour , to increase , over expose and pull development . john holland .
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 12:17 PM

I read in another forum that 7245 doesn't push very well. What about a stock makes it pushable/ not pushable. Grain structure?
Best,

Dan


A "push process" usually results in some contrast mismatch, as the red, green and blue records don't always respond identically to an extended development time. The stocks that have a reputation for slightly worse push process performance show a bit more mismatch.

Remember, a "push-1" process does NOT give a true one stop increase in real speed, just an increase in overall density so the processed negative prints/transfers more like a normal negative.
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#6 stephen lamb

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 12:20 PM

Oh ok.
Out of curiousity, if you wanted to have an image that is quite saturated, would pulling be a viable option? In general, how much contrast do you lose? I've heard pulling can make your images pretty muddy? I imagine that different stocks will react differently. Would a faster or slower stock be better for pulling? Or would it be better to simply pick the most saturated stock you could, and not worry about pulling? Thanks,
Steve
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 12:39 PM

Oh ok.
Out of curiousity, if you wanted to have an image that is quite saturated, would pulling be a viable option? In general, how much contrast do you lose? I've heard pulling can make your images pretty muddy? I imagine that different stocks will react differently. Would a faster or slower stock be better for pulling? Or would it be better to simply pick the most saturated stock you could, and not worry about pulling? Thanks,
Steve


Generally, a pull process will DECREASE both contrast and color saturation. A push process will increase the contrast of a color negative, and may slightly increase the color saturation (due to more time for the interimage and DIR couplers to act).

Certainly for video release or DI, you have lots of flexibility in boosting/desaturating color. Choosing any of the normal contrast Kodak color negative films is a good place to start, and consider 7285 for a really saturated "look":

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.5.6.4&lc=en

KODAK EKTACHROME 100D - 7285

Intense saturation + true 100 speed

Now you have a 100-speed color reversal motion picture film designed for daylight. Whether you're shooting ads, music videos, documentaries, television, or features, it delivers intensely saturated color, plus a neutral gray scale and accurate skin tones. All with a sharpness you won't find in any other 100-speed reversal film


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#8 Tony Brown

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 05:58 AM

I've found pushing DOES saturate slightly. If I'm shooting in contrasty light I usually pull a stop to soften the image a little. The difference is very subtle though.........
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