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cyan-green pastel look


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#1 Eric Trometer

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 05:56 AM

Hi,
I am looking for some personal feedback from people who might have done a similar process to the one i describe below. And possibly hear your opinions on different approaches, but remember that there is not time for extensive testing and budget is tight.
I will be filming an independent S16 short where some of the scenes require an green-cyan slightly pastel look where the windows of the interior shots blow out into the white and the blacks remain solid (i.e. Not milky and quite deep with a bit of crushing). I will be shooting Kodak's Vision2 100T 7212. I am also planning on bleach bypassing the negative to blow out those highlights and underexposing it by 2/3 of a stop mainly to add some grain but also to retain some detail on the skin. During filming I was thinking of using a ½ green enhancer in order to block out some of the other colours. At one particular point in the script however I want to emphasize a bright orange dress which should stand out and have not quite figured out a way other than in post to make this prop stand out.
I hope this makes sense to you guys and look forward to hearing your feedback
Eric Trometer ? Lighting Cameraman ? London
http://www.trometer.com
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 09:45 PM

You mention Super 16 -- is this project going to be blown up to 35mm, or transferred direct to video? Both scenarios offer opportunities to alter color and contrast.

I've done the washed-out cyan look on Super16 with 7277 overexposed and pulled one stop, shot uncorrected under cool-white fluorescents. Part of the "pastel" look is to NOT build up contrast too much, but instead actually flatten the gamma a little. You can still get rich blacks with a pulled negative. In my case I didn't want grain and the stock handled it well.

I think part of the danger with bleach-bypass on the neg is that it alters color and contrast a little unpredictably. It's certainly a look, but you really need to test to see the actual results (and whatever compensations you need to make).

You might be able to control color simply with lighting and production design, as I did in my short. That way when you need to introduce the orange dress, it will naturally stand out by color contrast, and you may be able to selectively light it with warmer light.
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#3 Chris Pritzlaff

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:22 PM

I just got some footage back on a film I shot on S16 a few weeks ago where we went for a blue-green that was achieved mostly through the lighting by gelling some of the lights with 1/2 CTB or Steel Green. One of the characters was wearing a red-orange dress, and it really stood out. I find that the Kodak stocks tend to pop the reds anyway, so you shouldn't have to much of a problem getting that dress to stand out. Thats just my two cents.
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#4 Eric Trometer

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 05:23 AM

Thanks for your replies guys and for your suggested alternatives,
Eventually we intend a 35mm blow up if we do find further funds for this project.
I understand your point about bleach by passing the negative. I did get an interesting link from Mark Woods and I am sure he won't mind me passing it on. So here it is: http://cameraguild.c...ting_limits.htm

It seems that with 2/3 to one stop underexposure, it brings the neg to an optimum density.
One of the main reasons why going for a bleach bypass on the neg is also to achieve a slight desaturation and a response in the highlights which is difficult to replicate with normal processing.
As budget is quite an issue we will not be able to go for a DI which would be much safer in terms of control.
But there we go, sometimes the old fashioned way still proves to be the best :)
Eric Trometer - London - Lighting Cameraman
http://www.trometer.com
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