Jump to content


Photo

Expiration of film stock?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Nooman Naqvi

Nooman Naqvi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Student
  • Chicago

Posted 23 April 2006 - 03:56 PM

Where is the expiration of film stock on the film-can? I have a 35mm & a 16mm fuji film can, but there is no expiration date on it. Where is it usually?
  • 0

#2 Adam Frisch FSF

Adam Frisch FSF
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2009 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, USA

Posted 23 April 2006 - 05:44 PM

There isn't one. They can trace it from the batch number, but that means calling Kodak or Fuji.

Why this is, I don't know. But I have my old conspiracy theories and they go something like this: they don't WANT to date the stock because that means they'd have to scrap or buy back old stock from the distributors, which would be seriously expensive.

People are also overly freakish about dates on film - just have a look at the bargains one can make on Ebay for stock that is out of date by so much as a day. Film doesn't self-implode and go bad overnight. It's not milk.

Their way, the stock gets used under the assumption that what you don't know, can't hurt you. Quite clever, actually, and probably a good thing. At least more environmentally friendly.
  • 0

#3 Nooman Naqvi

Nooman Naqvi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Student
  • Chicago

Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:00 AM

For how many years is the film usually good for? Say if I got a brand-new film today, it would expire in 200x?
  • 0

#4 Adam Frisch FSF

Adam Frisch FSF
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2009 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, USA

Posted 25 April 2006 - 04:55 PM

I think they say about 2 years. I say it's more, depending on how its kept. And if you freeze it, it'll last almost forever.....
  • 0

#5 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 25 April 2006 - 07:57 PM

Where is the expiration of film stock on the film-can?

The shelf life of the film stock depends entirely on the storage conditions. Since the manufacturer has no control over the way film is handled after they sell it, they obviously can't predict an "expiry date". Brand new stock might go off in a week if it's kept in a car boot (trunk) for a week in direct sunlight. Or it could last for several years if it's kept in a fridge.

Also, as the age fog increases gradually, there is no absolute cut-off point. Stock that is too far gone for some types of shot might still work well in other productions.

Expiry dates are useful for foodstuffs where you can't test the product (except by eating it and getting sick/not sick). They will be accompanied by instructions like "keep refrigerated" if that makes a difference.

You can always test filmstock if you are uncertain about its condition.
  • 0

#6 Nooman Naqvi

Nooman Naqvi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Student
  • Chicago

Posted 26 April 2006 - 12:32 PM

This helps alot. Thank you guys.
  • 0


Willys Widgets

The Slider

Glidecam

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Abel Cine