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Krasnogorsk 3 - getting started


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#1 raine

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 01:19 PM

Hey everyone,

So I inherited a K-3 in working condition. Having had a vx1000 and a panasonic dvx100 for a few years, I have severely skimped out on my film knowledge. I know next to nothing, my manual doesn't provide the basic info I need, and I couldn't find much info on the k-3 other than specs - but I really want to learn. Sooo if anyone can answer these questions, it would be so much appreciated.

1. manual says it takes single & double perforation - what's the difference?
2. what other "loads" are there besides daylight?
3. do i need Fuji or Kodak film?
4. manual says it's 6-50 fps and single frame - does that mean i can't buy 250 fps film? what type of film should i buy for an indoor shoot?

any more basic info i should find out would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you very much to anyone who takes the time to reply to this..!

-raine
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#2 Bryan Darling

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 01:51 PM

1. manual says it takes single & double perforation - what's the difference?


These are the sprocket holes that the camera "grabs" to move through the mechanism. Single perf means sprocket holes on one side, double perf means sprocket holes on both sides. Some older cameras could only take double perf since they were designed for a time when there was only double per film.

2. what other "loads" are there besides daylight?


The other "loads" are designed for cameras the can take larger amounts of film. You don't have to worry about anything other than daylight loads, more commonly called daylight spools.

3. do i need Fuji or Kodak film?


You can use any 16mm film made by any company, there are more than Fuji & Kodak. They are just the most common, other companies come from areas in Europe and the world.

4. manual says it's 6-50 fps and single frame - does that mean i can't buy 250 fps film? what type of film should i buy for an indoor shoot?

You are confusing frame rates with film speed. An easier way to look at the two, since on the surface they can be confusing, is fps (frames per second) means what rate of speed the film is physically moving through the camera. This helps to create effects such as sped up action or slow motion. Film speed is another way of saying how sensitive a particular 16mm film stock is to light. 50ASA needs lots of light, it's used almost always outdoors during the day. Whereas 500ASA needs far less light to get an exposure.

You'll also notice that there is usually a "T" or "D" next to the film speed number. This denotes the film type, whether it's designed to work in either "D"aylight or "T"ungsten light. Tungsten is also generically referred to as Indoor film. It's designed for movie lights and light bulbs you typically find in the lights people have in their homes. If you use Daylight film with Tungsten light (Indoors) or Tungsten film with Daylight your colors will be off.

This is very basic, there are a lot more little intricacies here and there in regards to film speeds, frame rates, and film type. However, this is a good basic starter description. I'm sure you'll get other people filling in. It gets very overwhelming very quickly with new people. I teach workshops in Super 8 & 16mm, the best thing to do is take in little bits of info at a time and experiment. You really should jump on amazon.com or somewhere else and buy the book Cinematography : Third Edition by Kris Malkiewicz, M. David Mullen. http://www.amazon.co...glance&n=283155
This book is an amazing resource and great tool for learning this crazy new world called Cinematography.

Good Luck & Have Fun!
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#3 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 04:08 PM

what other "loads" are there besides daylight?


Mind that high sensitivity stock should be loaded in total darkness... (I'm especially thinking of 7218 for instance or any 500 ISO stock...)
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#4 stoop

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 04:18 PM

Mind that high sensitivity stock should be loaded in total darkness... (I'm especially thinking of 7218 for instance or any 500 ISO stock...)



I recently loaded 7 x 500 asa 100ft spools in daylight, no problems what so ever.
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#5 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 09:10 PM

So did I... It's just what is labelled on the cans... I've always tried to be as dark as possible anyway, I don't like "daylight spools"...
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#6 raine

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 10:40 PM

Thanks a lot for the responses, it helped out a lot. My first attempt at shooting film is going to be a fashion show. I bought a 100 ft roll of 500 asa tuncston, because it's indoor. Another question - If I were to use this film to shoot a few seconds of shots outside the venue (in the evening light), would it be way to overexposed or messed up in any way, even if I keep the exposure really low? Since I want these shots, but don't want to waste a whole roll of 50 asa daylight on it.
Also, What effects do some other combinations make?

Thanks again for the tips!
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#7 Bryan Darling

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:13 AM

There is no easy answer for your question, as there are a lot of possibles and variables. The short answer is yes. However to really understand what you're trying to do and how to do it you really should get that book first. For one, shooting negative film will require you to convert it to video or a 16mm workprint made. However if you shoot a roll of reversal film, you can develop it and then directly project it. This is great for when you are first starting as it provides an easy and cheap way to see your results and learn from your mistakes without spending a lot of money.

I wouldn't pick a situation like you're talking about until I had shot some easy basic stuff to get the idea of exposures and how my camera works. I recommend you get a couple rolls of Black & White Tri-X or Plus-X reversal. Go outdoors during the day and shoot some shots of people and things. Then develop the film and watch it. Yes it's far less exciting, however wouldn't you rather make mistakes shooting stuff not nearly as important or interesting as a one-time fashion show?

By the way you'll need a lightmeter no matter what in order to properly set your camera's aperture. A good beginner meter is a Sekonic Studio Deluxe model L-398. You can get them cheap, around $60, and they are as accurate as a digital meter. But please, save yourself a lot of guessing and headache and get the book I recommended. It will clear up a lot of things for you and help to focus your questions.

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#8 Lance Boyle

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:27 AM

I have K3 also, and had a problem with the film slipping off the sprockets. It may have been a loading error on my part, but it was extremely aggravating to shoot for the next half hour and find that I hadn't been filming anything at all.

Where can you get extra lenses for the K3, anyhow?
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