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A bit of research on lighting in different countries


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#1 Hugh Wei

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 12:36 PM

Hi

I'm doing my research about light quality change in different countries. I read a article, and it says light quality changes in different countries, they believe each country or area has its own charactoristic lights. I'm very interested in it. would like to know where can i find some information about it, or if there is anyone who can give me a bit information, would be really appreciate.

regards
H
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#2 Patrik Akrenius

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 01:20 PM

here's a documentary about the myth of the painterly dutch light to begin with:

hollands licht


"Light diffuses in circles and needs time for that."
-Christiaan Huygens (1690)


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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:17 AM

here's a documentary about the myth of the painterly dutch light to begin with:

hollands licht
"Light diffuses in circles and needs time for that."
-Christiaan Huygens (1690)
________
Patrik Akrenius



It's mostly to do with where the country is in relation to the equator. Places like northern europe, South Africa, etc are quite far from the equator so even in the middle of the day, the angle of the sun is quite pleasant. In addition, the light passes through more atmosphere and gets subtlely diffused along the way. Contrast that with LA where midday gets you harsh toplight,
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#4 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 10:23 AM

Economic/technological considerations should also not be ignored.
A country that has poor or no access to certain lighting fixtures/supplies will make do with what they have.
This will greatly influence the look of the film.
Here in France for example foamcore does not exist in large sheets and we have to use really annoying polystyrene that crumbles and breaks, can't be scored and folded or easily punched into corners.
I really miss the silver/white sheets of foamcore that are used in the states.
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#5 Andrew Roddewig

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:41 PM

Economic/technological considerations should also not be ignored.
A country that has poor or no access to certain lighting fixtures/supplies will make do with what they have.
This will greatly influence the look of the film.
Here in France for example foamcore does not exist in large sheets and we have to use really annoying polystyrene that crumbles and breaks, can't be scored and folded or easily punched into corners.
I really miss the silver/white sheets of foamcore that are used in the states.


why doesn't foam core exist in large sheets in france? That seems so random because in the states it is a very common material for construction.
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#6 Hugh Wei

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 07:39 AM

It's mostly to do with where the country is in relation to the equator. Places like northern europe, South Africa, etc are quite far from the equator so even in the middle of the day, the angle of the sun is quite pleasant. In addition, the light passes through more atmosphere and gets subtlely diffused along the way. Contrast that with LA where midday gets you harsh toplight,



This is brillient information, I'll work from there.
Thank you all from all these information.

Hu
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#7 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 01:00 PM

Foamcore does not exist in large sheets in France because it is not used in construction. There are fewer houses made of brick and wood-stone is favored instead.
"Film Style and Technology" by Barry Salt is a great book that gives alot of in-depth information about how as film technology advanced in the early years, cinematic style changed enormously.
I believe that budget and accessibility of equipment and supplies in general are some of the biggest factors influencing any films style.
Fascinating subject.
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Visual Products

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Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Ritter Battery