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#1 Gino Terribilini

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 01:37 PM

Its not a huge mess-up, but its something to watch out for. Or maybe somebody else has some experience with this issue.

I am working on editing a short that we shot on both 16mm and 24p video. In Premiere (CS2), you select the timeline format you want to use (24p @ 23.976fps, DV @ 29.97 fps, 720p 60 @ 59.94 fps, etc). We had shot video part with 24p, so I created a timeline configured to support that format. When I went to import the film part that had been telecined to a DVCAM tape, the footage looked a little off. It looked okay, but what really threw me off was the fact that I had to render it. I couldn't, for the life of me, figure out what was wrong. It wasn't until we were well into editing that I remembered this whole timeline format thing. So I moved the entire sequence into a DV (29.97 fps) timeline and it all worked out. Now, there are some partial frames and weird rendered pieces, but they take no time at all to remove and clean up.

I'm not sure if they can transfer the film sequence onto video with the 24p timecoding, but it would prove to be useful if you plan on shooting with both film and video.
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#2 Canney

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 08:16 PM

Yeah what you shoot for a format and how you plan to edit it and what you plan to use for the final format always requires thought. And sometimes can present a real challange. Especially trying to get it all to flow smoothly from one to the other. See if they can transfer your film to PAL if they can't do it to 24p. The frame rate will transfer over better from 25 to 24 versus 30 to 24.
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#3 Chris_Burket

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 08:18 PM

Yeah what you shoot for a format and how you plan to edit it and what you plan to use for the final format always requires thought. And sometimes can present a real challange. Especially trying to get it all to flow smoothly from one to the other. See if they can transfer your film to PAL if they can't do it to 24p. The frame rate will transfer over better from 25 to 24 versus 30 to 24.



If you shot your film at 24 fps, just reverse telecine it before putting it in your timeline. I don't work with Premiere, just FCP and AVID. But, there's probably a way to do it in premiere as well. You can just reverse the 3:2 pulldown, and you'll have perfect 24 frame media.
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#4 Theo Lipfert

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Posted 21 May 2006 - 09:41 PM

To "reverse telecine" for Premiere you could run your clips through After Effects (assuming you have it) and have AE guess the pulldown pattern. From the browser, right click and choose "interpret footage > main". Once it is removed, render out your file at 23.976 and import into Premiere. Don't export an already cut sequence from Premiere to AE because the pull down pattern will change clip to clip. Do the AE part on your raw captures.

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#5 David Cox

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:26 AM

This problem has come about because of the common believe that it is possible to shoot "24P Video".

THERE IS NO 24P STANDARD DEFINITION VIDEO FORMAT!

What "24P SD" cameras shoot is a 525/29.97 (as in NTSC) video stream that has extra fields inserted. Therefore any other material that has been captured from video will (of course) also be a video format, even if it once upon a time existed on film.

As SkyDiveKansas pointed out, you needed to "reverse telecine" (remove the extra fields inserted by the 3:2 pulldown process) to get back to 24 clean frames per second, and a true 24FPS stream that can only exist digitally as either a computer file or HD format. Alternatively, you could have had your film transferred either to file or HD 24P to correctly carry your 24P film.
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