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Bolex Pro


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#1 gregorscheer

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 06:54 PM

Yes I was ridden by some kind of devil, I did not really need it as I have a very nice bolex el Super 16 to make my educational documentary films that you can see on my website. but when this camera came up on ebay my old bolex obsession drove me to bid on it and I won it. So here it is quite a monster looks like an Aanton and comes without an instruction. So far I did not even manage to see something through the viewfinder. I would love to know of anyone who has ever used it or even better who can provide a copy of the instruction manual.

here is a picturebolex01res.jpg
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#2 Mike Rizos

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 08:27 PM

Hi, Carlson's "Professional Cameramen's Handbook" covers the working operations of this camera. I can send you a copy of those pages if you can't come up with anyhting else. If you have the Bolex 16 PRO-100 model it will do to 100 fps. The regular model goes to 50fps, all crystal. Two more notes: Viewfinder is magnified 20x, shutter angle is 132 degrees, non adjustable. I think there were very few of these cams made.
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#3 Rod Otaviano

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 08:58 PM

I would love to know of anyone who has ever used it or even better who can provide a copy of the instruction manual.


Hey,

You might wanna check out this website:

http://homepage.mac.com/brianv1983/

They shot this short-film on this Bolex 16Pro. It was photograped by a guy named Justin Talley. You'll find him here:

http://homepage.mac....3/justintalley/

I talked to him a few months ago and he's a pretty nice guy. Pop him an email with your questions. I know for sure he'll be glad to help you.
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#4 gregorscheer

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:16 PM

Hi, Carlson's "Professional Cameramen's Handbook" covers the working operations of this camera. I can send you a copy of those pages if you can't come up with anyhting else. If you have the Bolex 16 PRO-100 model it will do to 100 fps. The regular model goes to 50fps, all crystal. Two more notes: Viewfinder is magnified 20x, shutter angle is 132 degrees, non adjustable. I think there were very few of these cams made.

Thanks Mike, I start to see the light thanks to your post, are there many pages in that book concerning the Bolex Pro (it is the 50fps model) It would be great if you could send them to me. But let me first see if I can't purchase the book. the one I found is the 4th edition is this the one you have?

Sounds like a great camera. As far as i know there where only under 200 of them built. My email address is gregor@vinestreetworks.com
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#5 Mike Rizos

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 10:43 PM

Hi, my book only says revised edition copyright 1970,1974,1981. Probably 3rd edition. I'm sure the 4th will have it.
The Bolex PRO section is 20 pages.
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#6 Tim Carroll

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 10:59 PM

Thanks Mike, I start to see the light thanks to your post, are there many pages in that book concerning the Bolex Pro (it is the 50fps model) It would be great if you could send them to me. But let me first see if I can't purchase the book. the one I found is the 4th edition is this the one you have?

Sounds like a great camera. As far as i know there where only under 200 of them built. My email address is gregor@vinestreetworks.com


Gregor,

Hold off on buying the Professional Cameraman's Handbook, Fourth Edition, the Bolex Pro is not in there. In fact no Bolex cameras are in there any more. I checked my American Cinematographer Manual, both my camera assistant books, and The 16mm Camera Book, and none of them list the Bolex Pro.

I'd take Mike up on his offer to xerox the pages from the third edition, because I think you are going to have a tough time finding much in print about that camera.

-Tim
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#7 gregorscheer

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 11:58 AM

Hey,

You might wanna check out this website:

http://homepage.mac.com/brianv1983/

They shot this short-film on this Bolex 16Pro. It was photograped by a guy named Justin Talley. You'll find him here:

http://homepage.mac....3/justintalley/

I talked to him a few months ago and he's a pretty nice guy. Pop him an email with your questions. I know for sure he'll be glad to help you.

Thanks, I certainly will,



Hi Mike I think I will have to take you up on your offer to scan or copy the pages in your book about the Bolex Pro the newer available edition does not contain those pages any more. can you scan the pages and send them by email or would you copy them and send them on paper or fax them. In any case I would like to reimburse your spending time and money and would send you $20.- if that could help

Kind regards

Gregor Scheer
VineStreetWorks
7 Vine Street
Staten Island, NY 10301

gregor@vinestreetworks.com
www.vinestreetworks.com

718 524 0221
fax 917 591 5149

Edited by gregorscheer, 28 April 2006 - 11:57 AM.

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#8 Jonathan Benny

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 02:13 PM

I own a Bolex 16 Pro 100. I've had it for about ten years. I don't use it much anymore and did not run a lot of film through it. But its designed like a tank (excuse the cliche).

The threading mechanism of this camera is quite unique. You only have to load on side of the coaxial and have the film tabbed out at the front. Then when your ready to load, you just latch the mag on the camera, turn the threading knob and the camera threads itself and winds the film on the other side of the coaxial mag on its own. It is easy to open the takeup side of the mage to make sure that the film has "catched".

Viewfinder is a challenge as the image does not remain in the upright position.

Mine has a 144 degree shutter. The lens is in great shape as it is protected by a housing that allows for an amazing servo system.

The challenge I've had with this camera is the battery system - very bulky and old. I've recently thought of somehow adapting it to a battery belt system and running film through it again.

Have fun with it. It was a camera far ahead of its time.

JB

Thanks, I certainly will,
Hi Mike I think I will have to take you up on your offer to scan or copy the pages in your book about the Bolex Pro the newer available edition does not contain those pages any more. can you scan the pages and send them by email or would you copy them and send them on paper or fax them. In any case I would like to reimburse your spending time and money and would send you $20.- if that could help

Kind regards

Gregor Scheer
VineStreetWorks
7 Vine Street
Staten Island, NY 10301

gregor@vinestreetworks.com
www.vinestreetworks.com

718 524 0221
fax 917 591 5149


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#9 Mike Rizos

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 06:54 PM

Hi Gregor I'll send them by mail tomorrow. Don't worry about $20-glad I can help.
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#10 gregorscheer

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 10:40 PM

Thanks Guys, you have all been very helpfull. Thanks to you I will soon have all the information needed
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#11 gregorscheer

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 10:54 PM

I own a Bolex 16 Pro 100. I've had it for about ten years. I don't use it much anymore and did not run a lot of film through it. But its designed like a tank (excuse the cliche).

The threading mechanism of this camera is quite unique. You only have to load on side of the coaxial and have the film tabbed out at the front. Then when your ready to load, you just latch the mag on the camera, turn the threading knob and the camera threads itself and winds the film on the other side of the coaxial mag on its own. It is easy to open the takeup side of the mage to make sure that the film has "catched".

Viewfinder is a challenge as the image does not remain in the upright position.

Mine has a 144 degree shutter. The lens is in great shape as it is protected by a housing that allows for an amazing servo system.

The challenge I've had with this camera is the battery system - very bulky and old. I've recently thought of somehow adapting it to a battery belt system and running film through it again.


Jonathan great to hear from you - I saw your trailer. great footage but I guess shot with another camera.. The Bolex pro I have is the standard 50fps model It is truly a tank 22.5lb without the film and the battery pack needs a donkey to carry it around. News gathering must have been quite a muscle sport in the 70s.

I am slowly finding out how it works. One thing I do not understand is the function of that little wheel on the back side of the view finder if I turn it the viewfinder gets darker. What is that for? and another question. What needs to be done for lubrication and do you ever cleen the gate? I fear that taking out the lens too often could hurt the little rubber couplings for the servos. And the Tuchel without a cable that is inserted into the battery part is that for chrystal?
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#12 Jonathan Benny

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 04:32 AM

One thing I do not understand is the function of that little wheel on the back side of the view finder if I turn it the viewfinder gets darker.


On my model, it switches between a clear tv-safe action within a 1.33 frame and just a 1.33 frame without the safe-action.

What needs to be done for lubrication


I've never lubricated it. There's a big yellow sticker near the movement that says "Aucune Lubrification". I do imagine, though, that it needs be lubricated at one point (!) and so thats probably something I'll also have to think about before starting it up again with a new battery.

and do you ever cleen the gate?


The pressure plate comes right out by swivelling the lock-lever on the inside upward. You pull the pressure plate out completely exposing the gate which is screwed into place and that I've never removed.

I fear that taking out the lens too often could hurt the little rubber couplings for the servos.


The lens can be taken on and off at will. Although, I agree that at this point, finding servicing will be a challenge and therefore it might be good to just keep it on. There is a wide-angle lens available - but I've never been able to find it.

And the Tuchel without a cable that is inserted into the battery part is that for chrystal?


Yes, Thats for crystal sync.

The pro100 is in most respects the same camera as the pro50. Let me know how it goes.

JB
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#13 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 07:50 AM

I used one on a project many years ago.Not much I can add except that even though it was a heavy camera, the balance was pretty good.It was one of my first experiences of shooting hand held run and gun style in 16mm.The threading scheme is one of the most unique and ingenious I've ever seen.

It's my uderstanding that Arriflex designed and built these cameras for Bolex.I guess they couldn't compete with the SR or the Aatons.
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#14 gregorscheer

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 11:32 PM

Just received the copied pages from Mike thanks a lot, very interesting stuff, I will study it serieously ... thanks a lot for all these postings, what an amazing forum !!!
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#15 Gregor Scheer

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 10:35 AM

I plan to shoot my next short feature for young audience: How Things Are Made: Paper in 1780 - Capellades, Catalunia using 2 bolex pro cameras. On the Pitch Packet website in construction for this film you can click cinematography where I collect information about the camera you can click to

1) an article in smallformat 01/2007
2) the pages in Carlsons Handbook
3) the electric schematics

the link is http://www.vinestree...capipitch1.html

we are considering conversion to super 16 Duall camera in New York sais they can do it - Will keep you updated

enjoy
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#16 Glenn Brady

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 12:14 PM

. . . finding servicing will be a challenge . . .


I've been advised by the Bolex factory that service for this camera may still be available from Ruedi Muster Film & Fernsehtechnik, 2545 Selzach, Tel. ++41 (0)32 641 10 46.
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#17 Vitaly Kolesnik

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 02:59 PM

Guys, someone has manual and the technical description of the camera? It is looking for!


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#18 Vitaly Kolesnik

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:12 PM

I am looking for all possible parts for the camera!


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#19 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 04:23 PM

Sent you a PM, Vitaly. /-Michael
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#20 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 11:13 PM

Do you still own one of these Michael? I always wanted to play with one, fascinating offshoot in camera history.

The only online resource I've found about the Bolex 16 Pro is this short overview in German:

http://www.filmtechn...ik/bo-blimp.htm

Otherwise, the system is covered in earlier editions of Carlson's Professional Cameraman's Handbook (but NOT the 4th edition from the 90s) which can sometimes be found second hand.
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