Jump to content


Photo

super 8 model rocket???!!!


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 April 2006 - 07:48 PM

I've heard a couple of times about putting a super camera into a model rocket. Has anyone done this or could someone walk me through the process of disecting a camera to put in a model rocket?

Second question:
I want to shoot this rocket off the beach over the ocean and attempt to capture a group of surfers waiting for waves. Yes i know, i'll believe it when i see it, most likely impossible, yada yada yada. So, when the rocket lands in the water and i have three of my buddies frantically paddleing to pick it up, will the salt water distroy the film?

even so; directions on how to put a super 8 camera on a model rockets would be pretty sweet, especially if you shoot it horizontally, over some houses in the outer sunset of san francisco.
  • 0

#2 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:22 PM

Estes Model rockets (www.estesrockets.com) used to make a rocket called the Camroc if I'm not mistaken back in the 70's that ran a short load of I believe 8mm film through a small camera. I remember I wanted one BAD but they were expensive however not to worry, this being the age of video they replaced it with this:

Oracle
Product Code: 2187
See first hand what it looks like from your rocket's point-of-view to be blasted off and then recovered. The easy-to-use video camera lets you capture digital movies from liftoffs to landings. Save the movies to your laptop or PC using the included software and USB cable.

They also make:

AstroCam 110
Product Code: 1327
The AstroCam 110 is back and better than ever! The aerial camera nose cone has a newly designed shutter release that makes it even easier to set up. This kit includes a FREE 24 exposure roll of Kodak Gold 110 color print film (ASA 400). Launch it on a B6-4 for close-up low altitude photos or take it to the limit on a C6-7 for high altitude shots.

I love model rocketry. Very cool stuff. B)

P.S. you may be able to find a vintage film Camroc (you may want to do some research and make sure about the name) on ebay, I haven't looked but they may come up every once in a while, Lord knows every other vintage toy does.

Edited by Capt.Video, 28 April 2006 - 08:27 PM.

  • 0

#3 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:36 PM

Also have you considered putting an Super 8 camera in a radio controlled plane and ond using a servo to turn it on over the area your trying to film? You'd probably have a bit more control over what your shooting if the camera were pointed straight down through a hole in the fusealoge although you would have to protect the lens and camera from the raw fuel model plane engines spit out while they are running- just a thought. :rolleyes:
  • 0

#4 rcgrabbag

rcgrabbag
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:41 PM

Actually, the Estes movie camera rocket was called the Cineroc. I have a couple:

RcGrabBag's Cineroc

The Cineroc carried about 10ft of super 8mm film in a special cartridge.

The Camroc took only one photo per flight (like the astrocam). I have two of those:

RcGrabBag's Camroc

Here's an actual clip from a Cineroc. Its a two stage rocket, so note the booster stage separating in flight:

Cineroc Footage

I've never actually flown the Cineroc, a bit too valuable to risk (they only made them from about 1970 - 75). Instead, I took an old cheapie Bell and Howell fixed focus S8 camera, tore it down to just the bare essentials (lens, motor, cartridge holder) and stuffed it into a rocket's payload section. The lens pointed up, so I had a small mirror in front of it at 45', and then another mirror outside the rocket in an aerodynamic shroud, also set at 45' so they worked like a periscope. The view was the same as the Cineroc's, looking down at the ground during flight.

Edited by rcgrabbag, 28 April 2006 - 08:49 PM.

  • 0

#5 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:56 PM

THAT"S IT! Cineroc! Thanks for correcting me, I couldn't remember. These were really neat little model rockets but because they were expensive, too expensive for most kids to afford, they're probably also very rare. You may have trouble finding one, but then again maybe you'll get lucky.... Actually you are lucky found one on Ebay right away Item number: 6053700851 in mint condition but again very expensive $650 buy it now price.

Edited by Capt.Video, 28 April 2006 - 09:03 PM.

  • 0

#6 rcgrabbag

rcgrabbag
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:59 PM

I actually have a couple of Cinerocs. One is completely unused, even has the original batteries (check my previous post above yours for links and pics, and a movie clip from a Cineroc).

Here are some Astrocam photos I took too:

RcGrabBag's Astrocam

Edited by rcgrabbag, 28 April 2006 - 09:08 PM.

  • 0

#7 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 28 April 2006 - 09:50 PM

Just watched your Cineroc footage, Thumbs Up Very cool :) Now I'm gonna check out your Astrocam stuff, which I'm sure will also be very cool. Thanks for sharing.

Edited by Capt.Video, 28 April 2006 - 09:51 PM.

  • 0

#8 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 April 2006 - 11:40 PM

Awesome that everyone is so pumped about this, but whats the word on the rocket landing in the ocean or shooting it horizontally? anyone know how to build one with out the kit?

i knew the forum would love this one. lol
  • 0

#9 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 29 April 2006 - 01:49 AM

Landing it in the ocean is a BAD idea, this isn't an Apollo capsule ya know, these things aren't designed to be waterproof and sense they are rare and expensive, dropping one in the drink and HOPING your friends can get to it, fish it out, bring it back to shore, get the film out without an accidental light exposure and then dry it before your film is ruined by ocean water, salt and sand doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

If anything, and I don't really recommend this but, launching it from a floating platform of some sort, like something built on the deck of a boat or a raft, towards the shore making sure the winds are blowing inland and hope to Hell there's enough of a breeze to get it to shore would probably be a lot smarter, if it makes it to shore and you have to do the shot a second time at least your camera won't be destroyed. If you do use a boat remember to turn on the bilge exhaust fans and clear out any diesel or gas fumes before launching the rocket otherwise the hull, being an enclosed space full of gas fumes could become an unitentional special effect.

launching one at a horizontal or low angle is another very BAD idea. Once the rocket has been launched, you have no control over it. It WILL go where ever it wants to and it won't fly very far. The chances are you could hit someone or something and hurt someone, damage or set something on fire with it or in the very best senario, crash it into the ground...HARD and again lose your very expensive little camera. This could be good for some exciting shots but I would definately rethink what your planning to do with it.
  • 0

#10 rcgrabbag

rcgrabbag
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:17 AM

Flying horizontally with the camera pointing out the side is also a bad idea for the aforementioned reasons, but also, rockets will spin in flight due to the slightest misalignment of the fins. A rocket pointing a lens out the side flying horizontally will shoot the ground only part of the time.

If you want to build a rocket, get a kit. Its cheap and it has most of the stuff you'll need like the engine mounting hardware, a parachute, fin material, and the nose cone (difficult to make by hand). Many are designed to be payload carriers as well.

If you go the route I took, that is, tearing down an old movie camera, the rocket you fly will have to be the "high power" variety due to the camera's size. Mine was about 4-5ft tall with a 4inch diamter body. There is too much info around high power rocketry to cover here. Check out:

Tripoli Rocketry Association

As for my camera, here are some pics of two I made.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
This was the first. There was a lot of metal in it, so I drilled it full of holes to lighten it. The orange triangle piece is a mirror housing I cut off from a toy periscope. Since the camera lens sat pointing up in the payload section, the mirror angled the view horizontally. Another mirror on the outside of the rocket in an aerodynamic shroud angled the view again back towards the ground.

Here's the second camera, mostly plastic construction so I left a lot intact.
Posted Image
Posted Image

Power for both came from a 9v battery. I'll see if I can dig up some pics of the actual rockets I used. They're long gone now (gave them to a budding rocketeer).
  • 0

#11 Herb Montes

Herb Montes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Other
  • Gulf Coast of Texas

Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:29 AM

Here's a website by someone seriously into hobby rocket photography including using movie cameras.

http://www.rocketryp....com/index.html
  • 0

#12 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 13 June 2006 - 03:44 AM

I know this is an old thread but for anyone wanting to put a camera in a rocket check out these cameras Item number: 7629077489 on ebay
  • 0

#13 Sam Javor

Sam Javor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 June 2006 - 10:18 AM

maybe it's just me but useing a rocket seems risky because you don't exactly have control of the return... perticularly next to a large body of water... why not use a kite or even a lot of baloons?
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Glidecam

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Opal

Glidecam

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc