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external filter for 6-66mm lens


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#1 Victor Mejia

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:27 PM

Hello all. Can anyone tell me what size external filter I need for a 6-66mm lens on a Bealieu 4008? Is a 49mm-85 filter the right size?
Thanks
Victor
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#2 santo

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:32 PM

62mm
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#3 Victor Mejia

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:54 PM

62mm


Did a quick search for a 62mm filter and saw that the Tiffen filfters are $76! The Hoya and Heliopan filters are about $30. That's a crazy difference. Does the brand really matter? Thanks, Santo.
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 09:07 PM

Did a quick search for a 62mm filter and saw that the Tiffen filfters are $76! The Hoya and Heliopan filters are about $30. That's a crazy difference. Does the brand really matter? Thanks, Santo.



I really hate to divert business from the established companies because the internet really makes it hard to survive because everyone can shop for the cheapest price without really knowing what the drop off in quality might be. I buy all of my filters new from either hoya or tiffen or similar established companies. However you can try eBay and sometimes you'll find some good values on used filters.

Filters generally jump up in price once you get over 55-58mm, so for future reference keep in mind if you ever need filters that are a bit smaller in size you might find they won't be nearly as expensive as a 62mm size filter costs.
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#5 Victor Mejia

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 09:43 PM

I really hate to divert business from the established companies because the internet really makes it hard to survive because everyone can shop for the cheapest price without really knowing what the drop off in quality might be. I buy all of my filters new from either hoya or tiffen or similar established companies. However you can try eBay and sometimes you'll find some good values on used filters.

Filters generally jump up in price once you get over 55-58mm, so for future reference keep in mind if you ever need filters that are a bit smaller in size you might find they won't be nearly as expensive as a 62mm size filter costs.


Thanks for the info. I want to shoot Vision2 200T and been told I need an external filter because the cart disables the internal filter on the camera. But I may just notch the cart myself and save the money. Thanks again.
Victor
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#6 santo

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 09:00 AM

Thanks for the info. I want to shoot Vision2 200T and been told I need an external filter because the cart disables the internal filter on the camera. But I may just notch the cart myself and save the money. Thanks again.
Victor


You won't have to notch the cart. If you open up the film compartment on your Beaulieu you'll see there is no button or sensor for a filter notch in the cart, nor is there any to read the asa film speed of the cart. Beaulieus are real cameras that don't work against a filmmaker. The user is assumed to be competent and turns the internal filter on or off and sets the film speed themselves. It's wonderfully confusion free.

Frankly, as long as your internal filter is in good shape, no reason not to use it with negatives. It's very slightly off (an 85a rather than an 85), but that will be unnoticeable most of the time, and the images will be colour corrected anyways in transfer and post.
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#7 Victor Mejia

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 10:02 AM

You won't have to notch the cart. If you open up the film compartment on your Beaulieu you'll see there is no button or sensor for a filter notch in the cart, nor is there any to read the asa film speed of the cart. Beaulieus are real cameras that don't work against a filmmaker. The user is assumed to be competent and turns the internal filter on or off and sets the film speed themselves. It's wonderfully confusion free.

Frankly, as long as your internal filter is in good shape, no reason not to use it with negatives. It's very slightly off (an 85a rather than an 85), but that will be unnoticeable most of the time, and the images will be colour corrected anyways in transfer and post.


AHH. How beautifully illuminating. Santo, thanks for the education. Very helpful as always.
All the best.
Victor
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