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Shooting the Sun


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#1 Gary Lemson

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 10:12 PM

Hello,

What is recommended when videotaping the sun (sunset for example) to protect the ccd imagers?

Thanks.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 07:44 AM

Hello,

What is recommended when videotaping the sun (sunset for example) to protect the ccd imagers?

Thanks.


I would suggest that if you cannot comfortably look at the sun with your eyes, you should not "stare" into the sun with your camera. That is, a pan across the sun is probably okay, but don't point the camera into the mid-day sun. Sunrise and sunset (when you can comfortably look at the sun) are okay, as the light is greatly filtered by the atmosphere.

Remember, some neutral density filters do NOT block all wavelengths of light, so there could be considerable UV or infrared energy, even with an ND filter.
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#3 Gary Lemson

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 11:27 PM

I would suggest that if you cannot comfortably look at the sun with your eyes, you should not "stare" into the sun with your camera. That is, a pan across the sun is probably okay, but don't point the camera into the mid-day sun. Sunrise and sunset (when you can comfortably look at the sun) are okay, as the light is greatly filtered by the atmosphere.

Remember, some neutral density filters do NOT block all wavelengths of light, so there could be considerable UV or infrared energy, even with an ND filter.


This is very interesting. Another area where film is superior. Is there an ND filter that would work? I have an 82mm thread.

Thanks much.

Edited by otari99, 30 April 2006 - 11:30 PM.

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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 02:10 AM

This is very interesting. Another area where film is superior.


This has come up several times lately (the sun thing, I mean).

Shooting the sun with a video camera is generally safe and easy, if you don't let it "cook" the CCD for too long. The interesting thing here is that it's actually easier to shoot bright subjects like the sun and welding with a video camera, beacuse the viewfinder is is electronic and will never get bright enough to damage your eyes (in all fairness, you can use a video tap on a film camera the same way).

Regarding ND's; what are you trying to expose for, the surface of the sun? Just close down the iris to taste, and if that's not enough then add whatever ND you like to get you to your desired stop.
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