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Exporting HDV footage to DVD in adobe premiere


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#1 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 12:31 AM

Hi, I shot a short film on HD100 HDV camcorder, edited it as HDV in Adobe Premiere Pro and now its the time to export to DVD. First, Adobe gave me errors when I tried to export it to DVD. Then I realized that the problem could have been that I did not downconvert to SD for exporting to DVD. Is it true? If this is the case, what do I have to do to export the footage to DVD? DO I have to downconvert? How? What is the best way to preserve the image quality which is essential.

Thank you very much

P.S. I forgot to add that when I try to export to DVD in adobe premiere pro is give me "Transcoding Error"

Edited by mastroiani, 30 April 2006 - 12:35 AM.

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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 05:47 AM

When I was burning my latest feature from HD, I downconverted to an uncompressed SD file (150 GB for 90mins) and did the color correction. the reason for this was the supersampling made the color space almost 4:4:4 (amost because MPEG artifacting obviously affects colorspace) and then converted that to MPEG.) once the color correction was done I rendered out to a DV file (18Gb) then I used Adobes DVD program to transcode it.

If you dont need to do color correction you can render to a DV file, or better a DVCPRO50 codec if availible. then do your final MPEG compression.
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#3 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 09:57 AM

When I was burning my latest feature from HD, I downconverted to an uncompressed SD file (150 GB for 90mins) and did the color correction. the reason for this was the supersampling made the color space almost 4:4:4 (amost because MPEG artifacting obviously affects colorspace) and then converted that to MPEG.) once the color correction was done I rendered out to a DV file (18Gb) then I used Adobes DVD program to transcode it.

If you dont need to do color correction you can render to a DV file, or better a DVCPRO50 codec if availible. then do your final MPEG compression.



Hi, thank you for your reply. I am not sure I understand any of this terminology unfortunately. What tools are there to downconvert or redner to DV file? How do I do all of that?
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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 10:05 AM

When I was burning my latest feature from HD, I downconverted to an uncompressed SD file (150 GB for 90mins) and did the color correction. the reason for this was the supersampling made the color space almost 4:4:4 (amost because MPEG artifacting obviously affects colorspace) and then converted that to MPEG.) once the color correction was done I rendered out to a DV file (18Gb) then I used Adobes DVD program to transcode it.

If you dont need to do color correction you can render to a DV file, or better a DVCPRO50 codec if availible. then do your final MPEG compression.

Can't you use the color-corrected uncompressed SD file to transcode to DVD? (I believe this is what's done on commercial releases, and would give superior results.) I would recommend against reducing it all the way to DV before transfer to DVD, if at all possible.
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#5 Troy Grant

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 03:51 PM

"What tools are there to downconvert or redner to DV file? How do I do all of that?"

Hello
Having never used Adobe Premiere Pro, I can only guess at how you would do this.
Try opening an regular SD timeline and importing your HD sequence into it. Then render it out. That should work , well at least it works in FCP.

Or try consualting Adobe directly.

Hope that helps.
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#6 Keith Mottram

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 01:32 PM

creativecow.net has forums for this and other adobe based post matters.

keith
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#7 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 02:51 PM

I was doing a screening cut, and was running out of time (we got a DVD out about 30 minutes before the premiere) so top quality wasnt my concern. DVCPRO50 however is 4:2:2 (I believe) and so is most mPEG DVD compression, so in terms of colorspace, I didnt think I was loosing much (other than the cosine compression messing around with the MPEG compression) What was important is that I did not trust adobe MPEG exporter, because I had problems with it in the past, and to get to a 3d party program I needed a full rendered version (and didnt have an extra 150Gb to do another uncompressed render) DVCPRO50 to DVD seemed very high quality to me, but DV at 4:2:0 you would have some colorspace loss.


As for how to downconvert, you cant actually import HD footage into an SD timeline. You need your cut on an HD timeline, but when you click file->export->movie select options and set the render codec from HDV to either DV or VFW (video for windows, basicly .AVI) and set your compression codec and other render settings.

Actually come to think of it, I might have rendered the MPEG directly from the timeline. I dont remember. I had a 24 hour edit session then 6 hours of compression/export so I was a little loopy at the end. I might have done it both ways, after one or the other messed up.
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