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Progressive/24P At what level? DVX,480P,720P?


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#1 f5.6

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 01:57 AM

Hey Gang,

So quick question....what is the general thought of the 24P mode but in different cameras?

Is there much of a difference between the camera's that have the 1/3", 2/3", 1" receptors in the 24P mode?

What does that extra space get you for your image? From the DVX100, to the F900 is it just deeper crunchier blacks?

I'm looking to shoot a short film and it would be easier for me to use a DVX100. I have some special effects I need to insert and the Visual guys are telling me not to mess with HD at this level so I've been checking out the different 24P cameras.

Thanks for any feedback

Patrick
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#2 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 09:45 AM

... Is there much of a difference between the camera's that have the 1/3", 2/3", 1" receptors in the 24P mode? What does that extra space get you for your image? ...

All things being equal (which they rarely are), the size of the image sensor(s) primarily affect depth of field capability/flexibility. When used with built-in or "same size" lenses (for example, a 1/2" lens on 1/2" CCDs, or a 2/3" lens on 2/3" CCDs), a larger sensor results in shallower DOF, depending on the f-stop and focal length.
http://www.panavisio...calcFOVform.asp

Add-on lens adapters and lenses can be fitted to a cam with a relatively small sensor, allowing it to achieve shallower DOF than the cam would normally be able to achieve. However, these adapters and lenses can add considerable size, weight and cost to the cam system, and can have other drawbacks, such as their groundglass creating undesirable artifacts. But used carefully they can achieve some interesting motion pictures.

As I mentioned, the devil is in the details. Each cam has its own set of characteristics. Although cams with larger sensors generally produce "better" video compared to cams with smaller sensors, this isn't always the case. For example, a particular sensor, large or small, may be significantly less light sensitive than another, requiring more light to generate as good or better video or noise level.

The Panasonic DVX-100, especially the current model DVX-100B, can produce 24p DV standard definition video which is well above average for a cam with three 4:3 1/3" CCDs, especially given its relatively low cost. Other, considerably more expensive 24p-capable DV cams, such as the 2/3" 3-CCD 16:9 Sony DSR-450WSL, are capable of generating 24p video which is naturally sharper, lower noise and with more accurate color. However, it depends on which two cams, formats and $$$ are being compared.
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#3 f5.6

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 06:51 PM

All things being equal (which they rarely are), the size of the image sensor(s) primarily affect depth of field capability/flexibility. When used with built-in or "same size" lenses (for example, a 1/2" lens on 1/2" CCDs, or a 2/3" lens on 2/3" CCDs), a larger sensor results in shallower DOF, depending on the f-stop and focal length.
http://www.panavisio...calcFOVform.asp

Add-on lens adapters and lenses can be fitted to a cam with a relatively small sensor, allowing it to achieve shallower DOF than the cam would normally be able to achieve. However, these adapters and lenses can add considerable size, weight and cost to the cam system, and can have other drawbacks, such as their groundglass creating undesirable artifacts. But used carefully they can achieve some interesting motion pictures.

As I mentioned, the devil is in the details. Each cam has its own set of characteristics. Although cams with larger sensors generally produce "better" video compared to cams with smaller sensors, this isn't always the case. For example, a particular sensor, large or small, may be significantly less light sensitive than another, requiring more light to generate as good or better video or noise level.

The Panasonic DVX-100, especially the current model DVX-100B, can produce 24p DV standard definition video which is well above average for a cam with three 4:3 1/3" CCDs, especially given its relatively low cost. Other, considerably more expensive 24p-capable DV cams, such as the 2/3" 3-CCD 16:9 Sony DSR-450WSL, are capable of generating 24p video which is naturally sharper, lower noise and with more accurate color. However, it depends on which two cams, formats and $$$ are being compared.





What a great report. Thank you for all that information. You really helped me understand the differences in the 24P cameras. Thank You.

Patrick
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