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super 8 vs single 8 projector?


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#1 LVD

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 05:28 PM

So I have no previous experience working with super 8 film and am wondering if a super 8 reel put through a single 8 projector with even work (particularly without ruining the film). With this old single 8 projector will there just be clipping? or is super 8 completly incompatible?
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#2 Andrew Means

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:06 PM

So I have no previous experience working with super 8 film and am wondering if a super 8 reel put through a single 8 projector with even work (particularly without ruining the film). With this old single 8 projector will there just be clipping? or is super 8 completly incompatible?



Super 8 uses a different hole pattern, so yeah, your standard 8 projector will at best not thread and at worst will seriously muck up your film.
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#3 Clive Tobin

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:49 PM

So I have no previous experience working with super 8 film and am wondering if a super 8 reel put through a single 8 projector with even work (particularly without ruining the film). With this old single 8 projector will there just be clipping? or is super 8 completly incompatible?


If it is Fuji Single-8 made since 1965 it is fully compatible with super-8, the perforations etc. are the same. The film thickness is different and probably so is the curl so you will need to set the focus a bit differently.

However there was a Single-8 format many many years ago (maybe back in the 1940s?) that was a version of regular-8 but shot in the single width instead of double 8. So projection equipment for this won't take super-8.
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#4 Joe Gioielli

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 10:24 AM

Hi and welcome.

Please check and see if your projector states that it is "SIngle 8", "Super 8" or "Regular 8"

If your projector is "regular 8" it will tear up "Super 8" film.

I learned that the hard way :(

Best wishes
Joe
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#5 LVD

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 12:18 PM

thanks guys, I am not in possession of the projector at the moment so I can't check, but know it isn't a super 8 projector so I'll just start shopping around. Can anyone recommend a decent one that would be relatively inexpensive? Don't need anything incredible. Just would like something for reasonable quality viewing.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 12:20 PM

There were some 8mm projectors that could switch between the old "Regular-8" and Super-8 film. But the perfs are entirely different.
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#7 David W Scott

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 02:18 PM

thanks guys, I am not in possession of the projector at the moment so I can't check, but know it isn't a super 8 projector so I'll just start shopping around. Can anyone recommend a decent one that would be relatively inexpensive? Don't need anything incredible. Just would like something for reasonable quality viewing.



I use a cute little Noris Record D projector. It comes with two complete assemblies of gate and sprockets, one set for Super 8 and one for Regular 8. It's not an instant solution to switch between the two, but it provides perfect registration for both formats.

The projector even has a little spot to store whichever gate/sprocket module you aren't currently using.

The Noris projectors are cheap, and produce a nice (if small) picture. They use a very effective spring loaded pressure plate. The Noris Record D also has a nice variable-speed control.
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#8 Joe Gioielli

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 07:39 PM

Back in my day my schools all used Bell & Howell's so that's what I buy. Not fancy, but they work. Try to get one from the 1970's.

Ask around before you buy, though. A friends mom or dad just may have one in the closet.

Joe
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#9 Alan Duckworth

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 05:45 PM

I would advise against a dual-guage projector (that is, with both Regular and Super), because if you forget to change over - or someone else uses the machine - you will trash your film. Buy a dedicated projector for the format you are using.....and it can get complex:

Most Regular 8 cameras were made to frame at 16 fps, some framed at 18 fps, and Regular 8 sound (very rare) frames at either 18 or 24 fps! Also, high-end Regular 8 cams had variable framing rates (my R8 Bolexes all go from 8 to 64 fps). And different projectors were made for all these - including variable speed models.

Super 8 is easier - silent frames at 18 fps, and sound frames at either 18 or 24. (Note: when Super 8 is used professionally, the framing rate is usually 24, to maximise image quality, reduce flicker, and make transfer to 35mm easier).

Suggestion - if you can find a working Super 8 sound projector, you will find that it can project at either 18 or 24 fps - plus, it will probably also have a pitch control. The purpose of this was to allow you to correct for cheap cameras that ran slightly slow (sound film stock took a lot of dragging through the cameras), and it was intended to correct the audio. But it can also be used to correct - or creatively change - the effective framing rate.
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