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#1 bearcub

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 01:36 PM

I got 400 ft of film back from Lablink/Magno in NYC and the video transfer shows blue lines
going vertically over my film.

I have not yet looked at the negative but it was a new can and the camera used (Eclair NPR)
had been used several times along with the magazine that held the film.

The blue lines don't completely go from top to bottom but they show through everything,
including black.

Any ideas? I plan to look at the negative carefully this afternoon.

Sorry, I just searched blue lines and find this topic posted before!
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 01:36 PM

Sounds like a scratch.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 02:03 PM

I got 400 ft of film back from Lablink/Magno in NYC and the video transfer shows blue lines
going vertically over my film.

I have not yet looked at the negative but it was a new can and the camera used (Eclair NPR)
had been used several times along with the magazine that held the film.

The blue lines don't completely go from top to bottom but they show through everything,
including black.

Any ideas? I plan to look at the negative carefully this afternoon.

Sorry, I just searched blue lines and find this topic posted before!


Sounds like a pre-process scratch or pressure mark. The blue (yellow dye) layer is most affected because it it the topmost imaging layer. In a tungsten balance film, the blue-sensitive layers have the largest (most sensitive) grains as well.

Now you need to work with your lab and the film manufacturer to determine if the scratch occured during film manufacturing (e.g., on a perforator), in your camera, or in the handling of the raw stock by the lab. If it had been Kodak film, you can provide samples of the problem and any other information through the lab to Kodak's NYC office for investigation as a "field report". Kodak keeps "end test" samples of just about every roll of motion picture film sold to aid any investigation. Kodak technical people in NYC work closely with the labs.
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Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine