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Memoir about Miniatures in movies


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#1 Roselyne

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 09:05 PM

Hello everyone :)
How are you all? :)

I just arrived here and this area seems the right (I hope?) place to put this topic.

I'm actually in a movie school in Belgium (IAD) in my final year, and I have to do a memoir (thesis?) about "Miniatures and Forced Perpective in Movies".

I assume some of you did work in the past with miniatures, so I'm trying to collect all (or most of) the info about how what to do if one wants to use/create miniatures for his/her movie.

I'm searching for info about:
- what are the type of lenses adviced to shoot miniatures?
- wide angle versus short angle?
- are there specific camera to shoot miniatures (static, or in motion)
- what type of materials/technics are mostly used or advised for:
* ground,stone,wood,rocks,....
* Fire and explosions (reducing oxygen in a transparent tank?)
* Water
* Animatronics
* smoke, Haze
- Are there specific lightings to use? A specific direction of Photography?
- What diaph is better to use, related to the "focus depth" (is it how you say it in english?)
- is the classical formula for speed always working for very small miniatures (like 1/72? when I tried with the speed given by the formula for that small scale, it seemed twice too slow :huh: )

- which kind of angle to use for forced perspective (like hobbits and humans in the same plan, for example... ^^; )

Thaaaaaaaaaaanks a lot in advance :D :D :D

You shall be credited in the memoir (and if you want, I'll send you an issue of it :) who knows, it might be useful to you too in the end :) )

Big kiss and a hug :)

::Roselyne::
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 09:18 PM

Books?:

http://www.theasc.co...catalogno=11207

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8
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#3 Roselyne

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 04:52 AM

Books?:

http://www.theasc.co...catalogno=11207

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8

http://www.amazon.co...5Fencoding=UTF8



Thanks a lot for the books references, mister John Pytlak :)
It seems the last one would meet many of my questions ;)

Now, I'm wondering also about what any of you did experienced personally (especially since the book is from October 2000 and there may have been new technics, new attempts, etc...

Are there some of you who tried to make make/shoot miniatures and met some problems doing so? :)
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#4 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 08:56 AM

One particularly interesting forced perspective technique was used on the lord of the rings trilogy, as discussed in the making of dvd's. Forced perspective usually means static shots, because too much movement will destroy the illusion of scale. There solution was to connect the set and the camera to a motion control device, so that as the camera made a tracking shot, part of the set would move in the opposite direction, thereby continuously correcting the perspective. You don't get to see a lot of it on the dvd, but it's worth it.
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#5 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 03:57 PM

There's still tons of miniture work done on all the big budget movies made today, despite what it many times sounds like.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 06:34 PM

There's still tons of miniture work done on all the big budget movies made today, despite what it many times sounds like.


Kodak Cinesite in the UK does LOTS of minature and model work, in addition to their digital VFX:

http://www.cinesite.com/

http://www.cinesite.com/?101&0&4964

The team behind Harry Potter & The Goblet of Fire and Charlie & The Chocolate Factory created the stunning and controversial visual effects sequence in V For Vendetta in which The Old Bailey and The Houses of Parliament are realistically blown to pieces, to the accompaniment of the 1812 Overture.

Their work involved weeks of architecture and building research, construction of the massive 30 foot high 10th scale models at Shepperton Studios, model unit photography and compositing of the models into background footage of London. The realistic model and digital effects make the disturbing sequence highly convincing and will leave cinema-goers wondering "How did they do that?"


http://www.cinesite.com/?131&0&4834

Cinesite completed key digital sequences, all miniature construction and photography and all the VFX scanning and recording for Warner Bros' Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Based on the classic Roald Dahl novel, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is directed by Tim Burton with Visual Effects Supervision by Nick Davis.


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Glidecam

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Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC