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Weston Master 3 light meter help


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#1 grantsmith

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 08:51 AM

Hello. Hopefully some kind person will be able to help me. I'm looking to shoot a little bit of film on my bolex h16 (non- reflex). I can't afford a digital light meter so bought a cheap anologue one from e-bay (the weston master 3 - cine). My problem is that I can't understand at all how to use it! I've used a digital one before which was fine - i just dialled in the film speed, shutter speed and fps. On this however I can't make heads or tails of it. What is all this relative brightness and weston ratings business? I have 100ft of 64d which I want to shoot at 24fps. What do i do? Any help would be very appreciated
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 09:31 AM

First of all, it's a reflective light meter. That means you point the sensitive surface (glass with little lenses ) toward the subject. No matter the distance, but from the camera's direction.

Try to avoid the sun fall on it it would give a false reading.

Second, it uses EV. The needle will show a number. typically beetween 2 and 10 for "low/normal" lights. For highlights, you must put the plastic disk in front of the sensitive surface. You then have EV beetween 10 and 15 or 16.

Then you report the red index in front of that number (the needle stopped by).

After you have set the ASA it will the give you all the possible combinations of F stops at different speeds (that is for still photography). At 24 fps, consider the speed is 1/50 s.

So here is an exemple :

I have a EV of 7. At 64 ASA, a speed of 1/50 (written 50 on the disk) gives me a F stop of 2.

You can do you metering on a 18 % grey, that's how it's calibrated.

If I had read on a caucasian skin, I'd find the good value in the little window "Exposure value". In this case, I read 8-1/3. I then would give me a stop of 2.8-1/3 (logical).

Mind that you need to press a unlock button to change asa settings and press the right side button to get a reading.

Does it help ?
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#3 Andy Sparaco SOC

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 09:51 AM

Weston meters are Selenium cell meters which means the photocell actually generates electricity that moves the meter needle. If it is ancient as it is likely to be it may not be very accurate. Modern meters are photoresitor type meters in which the photo cell makeing the reading acts as a light driven resitor to the current supplied by the battery.

Selenium cell meters actually work very well in bright light and have no memory. But were usually always on which means the cell may have worn out.

Check it against another meter before you use it - a still camera meter would work.

The classic Spectra 500combi is also a Selenium cell meter. Use one to check the my other two meters at the start of each shooting day.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 02:00 PM

The classic Spectra 500combi is also a Selenium cell meter. Use one to check the my other two meters at the start of each shooting day.


FYI, Spectra still calibrates their older Selenium meters like Candela's, Combi-500's, and Pro's for $50.00 not including return shipping. The only requirement for the flat rate price is obviously the meter has to be working when you send it to them. The sensitive Cadmium Sulfide photocell on Combi-500's is usually dead by now, that does not affect its ability to function otherwise.

For the cost of a used Spectra plus calibration one would have at least one meter one could trust, period!

http://www.spectraci...contact_us.html
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#5 Freya Black

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 04:43 AM

Hello. Hopefully some kind person will be able to help me. I'm looking to shoot a little bit of film on my bolex h16 (non- reflex). I can't afford a digital light meter so bought a cheap anologue one from e-bay (the weston master 3 - cine). My problem is that I can't understand at all how to use it! I've used a digital one before which was fine - i just dialled in the film speed, shutter speed and fps. On this however I can't make heads or tails of it. What is all this relative brightness and weston ratings business? I have 100ft of 64d which I want to shoot at 24fps. What do i do? Any help would be very appreciated


Believe it or not, you must have a better meter than mine as I only have a weston master 2 cine meter! It's my best meter at the moment too!!! ;)

Okay I think the problem you are having is that the meter does not work in ASA (gasp!) but in Weston speeds!
64ASA is 50 in Weston speeds, so you would set the dial to 50 rotate it so that the 50 is in front of the 24 (fps), read the number off the meter and relate the numbr in white on black on the outer right side edge, to the inner number in black on white that it corresponds to, which will be your f-stop. :)

I've no idea what they mean by relative brightness and you need to know if you have a type A or type B camera (which I think refers to shutter angle. My guess is it is a type A you have but I'm not sure.

It's obviously worth checking your meter against a known good one to be sure all is well.

Then you should be away and happy!

love

Freya
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#6 Freya Black

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 05:02 AM

Forgot to mention something important because at 64 ASA I expect you are shooting by the sun. If your meter reads more than 16, then you need to close the light baffle at the back of the meter. Otherwise keep it open.

Okay! Here is a table of ASA to Weston speeds:

http://ptthome.club.fr/weston-conv.htm

If you have the leather case it normally lives in then it might be worth having a conversion table on the inner flap, at least for common film speeds. So unless you are thinking of shooting on some print stock or have a stash of K40 then you might want to start at 50 and then perhaps list speeds up to 500ASA or something.

Anyway, there is also a manual here:

http://ptthome.club.fr/acess-08.htm

Hey, it's not so bad, this poor fellow is not only converting weston speeds but shooting still film too and converting to shutter speeds! Yowch! :)

We've got it easy! :)

love

Freya

Edited by Freya, 06 May 2006 - 05:06 AM.

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#7 grantsmith

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 06:56 AM

Forgot to mention something important because at 64 ASA I expect you are shooting by the sun. If your meter reads more than 16, then you need to close the light baffle at the back of the meter. Otherwise keep it open.

Okay! Here is a table of ASA to Weston speeds:

http://ptthome.club.fr/weston-conv.htm

If you have the leather case it normally lives in then it might be worth having a conversion table on the inner flap, at least for common film speeds. So unless you are thinking of shooting on some print stock or have a stash of K40 then you might want to start at 50 and then perhaps list speeds up to 500ASA or something.

Anyway, there is also a manual here:

http://ptthome.club.fr/acess-08.htm

Hey, it's not so bad, this poor fellow is not only converting weston speeds but shooting still film too and converting to shutter speeds! Yowch! :)

We've got it easy! :)

love

Freya




Thanks for your help guys. This is much appreciated. I cant wait to go out and shoot this film now. cheers
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#8 grantsmith

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 01:56 PM

Thanks for your help guys. This is much appreciated. I cant wait to go out and shoot this film now. cheers




Oh. I gorgot to ask. Can anyone confirm whether my non-reflex Bolex H16 is type A or B. Thanks again!
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#9 Freya Black

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 02:44 PM

Oh. I gorgot to ask. Can anyone confirm whether my non-reflex Bolex H16 is type A or B. Thanks again!


Looking at that manual I gave the link to, most of the usual shutter angles seem to be type A, so I think that is the way to go.

Type B is 90 to 149 degrees. I've not heard of a camera with such angles but I expect they are out there! :)

love

Freya

Edited by Freya, 09 May 2006 - 02:47 PM.

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#10 richcam1

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 12:24 AM

Be carefull!! It may not be accurate!!! All meters drift with time!

Prost,
Rich :o

Hello. Hopefully some kind person will be able to help me. I'm looking to shoot a little bit of film on my bolex h16 (non- reflex). I can't afford a digital light meter so bought a cheap anologue one from e-bay (the weston master 3 - cine). My problem is that I can't understand at all how to use it! I've used a digital one before which was fine - i just dialled in the film speed, shutter speed and fps. On this however I can't make heads or tails of it. What is all this relative brightness and weston ratings business? I have 100ft of 64d which I want to shoot at 24fps. What do i do? Any help would be very appreciated


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Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

CineLab

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

CineTape