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Question on the different Super 8 film formats.


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#1 VincentD.

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 05:35 PM

Hey everybody,

I just have a quick question on the different super 8 film formats.

First part: For Black and White, whats the difference between plus-x and tri-x?

Second part: For Color, whats the difference between 200T and 500T?

Final Part: What are the advantages/disadvantages of Ektachrome 64, I notice its not available in 200T or 500T, its just on its own, even though its in color and the other color format is divided into 200 and 500. If anybody could clear these up that would be great!

Thanks!
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#2 Joe Gioielli

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 08:09 PM

Hey Vincent,

Nice to have you here. Go to the kodak website and look at the "conematography" section.

Films are divided by film speed (how much light they need), the size of the grain (the chemicals that create the image), the way it renders color, and "negative" and "positive"(which is called reversal, because it is the "reverse" of a "negative").

A negative filmstock (like traditional 35mm camera film)produces an image that is reversed (don't get confused) from real life, it has to be printed to get a normal image.

Reversal film (like a slide) is the reverse of a negative. You get a real little picture on your film.

Thats enough to get started, Go to the website and read it, go to the library and get a book on 35mm photography, then get a cheap old manual 35mm camera and fool around with it for awhile. I know it sounds silly, but it really will make understanding movie cameras a lot easier if you get the basics down.

It's not hard, but it is complicted. There is a lot to it and mistakes are expensive on movie film. 35mm is cheap. Go nuts and run wild. Learn about shutter speeds, apetures, and film speeds with the still camera.

Best Wishes

Joe
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:41 PM

Hey everybody,

I just have a quick question on the different super 8 film formats.

First part: For Black and White, whats the difference between plus-x and tri-x?

Second part: For Color, whats the difference between 200T and 500T?

Final Part: What are the advantages/disadvantages of Ektachrome 64, I notice its not available in 200T or 500T, its just on its own, even though its in color and the other color format is divided into 200 and 500. If anybody could clear these up that would be great!

Thanks!


The Kodak website gives technical data and a description of each film:

http://www.kodak.com....1.4.14.4&lc=en

In general, the reversal films are primarily designed for direct projection after processing, but can also be transferred to video.

The Kodak VISION2 Color Negative Films are ideally suited to telecine transfer, and offer exceptional latitude.

In general, a faster film (like 500T or Tri-X) will have slightly more graininess than their slower sister films.
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#4 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 11:15 AM

Hey everybody,

I just have a quick question on the different super 8 film formats.

First part: For Black and White, whats the difference between plus-x and tri-x?

Second part: For Color, whats the difference between 200T and 500T?

Final Part: What are the advantages/disadvantages of Ektachrome 64, I notice its not available in 200T or 500T, its just on its own, even though its in color and the other color format is divided into 200 and 500. If anybody could clear these up that would be great!

Thanks!


Plus X is 100ASA and TriX is 200ASA in daylight. TriX is twice as fast as PlusX which means it's twice as sensitive to light. 500T is 2.5 times more sensitive than 200T.

Abundance of light (sunny day) = slow film
Low light = faster film
faster film = slightly more grain
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#5 andres victorero

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 05:05 PM

HI VicentD, avoid the fastest stocks if you can. Super 8 is small so more fast stock = more grainess and this in super 8 is very, very important

good luck ;)
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