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Experiences with the ArriScan


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#1 Jim Murdoch

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 08:54 PM

After the initial fanfare, I've never really heard much about the Arriscan film scanner. In an unrelated phone conversation with a chap at a post production house who had been responsible for having one installed, he basically said: "It's the most splendid film scanning appliance in telecinematic history, but then, I would say that, wouldn't I!"

And it's true, another guy in another place said almost the same thing about his/ their Imagica machine.

So, how well do they work? What do they do well, and what do they do not so well, if anything. I get the impression that the Arriscan just gets on with the job and they sort of forget it's there. Is that possible?
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#2 Filip Plesha

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:02 PM

What about that Imagica with a 10K head? Did it come into existence, and can you actually pull out 10K files or does it automatically downsize it to 4K ?
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#3 Jim Murdoch

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:29 PM

What about that Imagica with a 10K head? Did it come into existence, and can you actually pull out 10K files or does it automatically downsize it to 4K ?

I don't know. I heard there was an 8K scanner in the pipeline.
I think you were supposed to be able to output the raw scanning info, although there would be a massive data rate involved, but that's not really the idea.

The whole idea with oversampling is that it allows the scanning computer to synthesize in software the optical low-pass filter normally needed for a conventional 4K scanner. Basically, it can produce two downconverted images: one with filtering and one without. Only when it detects a significant difference between corresponding areas of the two images, (ie when Nyquist artifacts occur) does it output the filtered version, for just those pixels.
In most cases the majority of the scanned frame area is OK without any filtering, and so the low-pass filtering is effectively only applied to the areas of the image that actually need it. The result is a 4K output with sometimes twice the effective resolution of one that is actually scanned at 4K.

This is also one reason why Standard Definition TV downconverted from HD often looks better than stuff originated on SD equipment

Edited by Jim Murdoch, 06 May 2006 - 09:32 PM.

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