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SDX900 scene files and batteries


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#1 Brian Beard

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 10:34 PM

I am looking for scene file settings for the panasonic sdx900.

I am interested to hear what file setting you might have and what you think of the looks? I have downloaded all the scene files from Panasonics web site and tried a few.

I am currently shooting a show with a Sony D35 Betacam and we are considering a change to the SDX900. Is there anyone who has tried matching these two cameras together? Or at least tried to get a similar look. I need this in order to match existing footage. I am wondering if you have done this in the past and have saved a file on an SD card?

I am also looking for good lith-ion batteries for the panasonic sdx900. I am not completely sold on the anton bauer system that is usually packaged with it. Does anyone have any advice on a good battery system. I have heard good things about sony lith-ion batteries. Light weight is a priority! I do not like to operate with any of the "bricks" as I shoot mostly handheld. Any thoughts?

Thank you
B Beard
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#2 John Ealer

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 10:33 AM

I am looking for scene file settings for the panasonic sdx900.

I am interested to hear what file setting you might have and what you think of the looks? I have downloaded all the scene files from Panasonics web site and tried a few.

I am currently shooting a show with a Sony D35 Betacam and we are considering a change to the SDX900. Is there anyone who has tried matching these two cameras together? Or at least tried to get a similar look. I need this in order to match existing footage. I am wondering if you have done this in the past and have saved a file on an SD card?

I am also looking for good lith-ion batteries for the panasonic sdx900. I am not completely sold on the anton bauer system that is usually packaged with it. Does anyone have any advice on a good battery system. I have heard good things about sony lith-ion batteries. Light weight is a priority! I do not like to operate with any of the "bricks" as I shoot mostly handheld. Any thoughts?

Thank you
B Beard


It wouldn't be hard to match an SDX to a D35, just shoot 60i with STD gamma around .5, probably turn the detail up to around +15 both V & H and you'll be in the ballpark. Any closer tailorings would have to be done based on the way your D35 was set up.

Also, keep in mind that the SDX is 16:9 native, so if you've been shooting 4:3 you'll probably want to get a lens with a 0.8x ratio converter.

In terms of batteries, I personally think Sony is way down the list... To save dough on a different battery mount, you could try Anton Bauer li-ion Dionic 90's, light, with good performance. They've always worked well for me.

J
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#3 Brian Beard

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 12:10 AM

It wouldn't be hard to match an SDX to a D35, just shoot 60i with STD gamma around .5, probably turn the detail up to around +15 both V & H and you'll be in the ballpark. Any closer tailorings would have to be done based on the way your D35 was set up.

Also, keep in mind that the SDX is 16:9 native, so if you've been shooting 4:3 you'll probably want to get a lens with a 0.8x ratio converter.

In terms of batteries, I personally think Sony is way down the list... To save dough on a different battery mount, you could try Anton Bauer li-ion Dionic 90's, light, with good performance. They've always worked well for me.

J



Thank you J!
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#4 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 08:50 AM

I shoot with the 900 a lot and have been disappointed with the performance of the anton bauer bricks. It really drinks them down. Unfortunately i don't have a better option for you.

Look wise, of the preprogrammed scenes, i really like the Vivid setting which replicates Velvia. A few of the others are good, but most are VERY treated and of little use.

Overall a very good SD camera. Put a Zeiss digiprime on the front and you can really get a nice image.
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#5 Brian Beard

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 12:03 AM

I shoot with the 900 a lot and have been disappointed with the performance of the anton bauer bricks. It really drinks them down. Unfortunately i don't have a better option for you.

Look wise, of the preprogrammed scenes, i really like the Vivid setting which replicates Velvia. A few of the others are good, but most are VERY treated and of little use.

Overall a very good SD camera. Put a Zeiss digiprime on the front and you can really get a nice image.


Thanks Chad, I am still on the hunt.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 01:46 AM

Also, keep in mind that the SDX is 16:9 native, so if you've been shooting 4:3 you'll probably want to get a lens with a 0.8x ratio converter.


The SDX is switchable to 4:3 in camera, and looks great in doing it.

I've found that to emulate the Sony colorimetry with the Panasonic, I've had to up the red gamma quite a bit. But that was a tweak done on the fly, in the field. Given the opportunity I'd put both cameras up on a vectorscope and get into the SDX's color matrix and try to dial in each of the 12 colors to match.

Panasonic cameras in general, and the SDX in particular, have such a clean, pure color rendition with better blues and less excess warmth than Sony cameras.
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#7 John Ealer

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 08:28 AM

The SDX is switchable to 4:3 in camera, and looks great in doing it.


Yes, but to get that 4:3 you're using the center section of the SDX's 16:9 sensors, which doesn't have any compromises resolution-wise, but you do lose 20% of your horizontal field of view.

So if you put an 18x7 zoom (for example) from your 4:3 D35 onto the SDX, suddenly your widest angle is effectively around 8.4mm. The 0.8x ratio converter fixes this.

J
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#8 Brian Beard

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 09:11 AM

Yes, but to get that 4:3 you're using the center section of the SDX's 6:9 sensors, which doesn't have any compromises resolution-wise, but you do lose 20% of your horizontal field of view.

So if you put an 18x7 zoom (for example) from your 4:3 D35 onto the SDX, suddenly your widest angle is effectively around 8.4mm. The 0.8x ratio converter fixes this.

J



I will be using a Canon 17x7.7 whicich is switchable from 4:3 to 16:9. Do I still need a 0.8xratio converter?

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#9 John Ealer

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 09:14 AM

I will be using a Canon 17x7.7 whicich is switchable from 4:3 to 16:9. Do I still need a 0.8xratio converter?

B Beard


No, you don't. That 16:9 to 4:3 switch is the ratio converter.

J
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