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Creating cold, overcast look-feel


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#1 Melissa North

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 02:50 AM

Hi,

Im going to be shooting a film in a few months time which calls for most scenes to have the look and feel of a cold, overcast day. I will be shooting on super 16 (and transferring to tape), both interiors and exteriors, and will quite probably have to shoot both on sunny and overcast days. I am going to start doing tests on getting this look, on both sunny and overcast days shortly and have a few ideas but would love hear any ideas other people may have.

Firstly, obviously having cold colours in the production design and having characters rugged up in jumpers etc will help create this feel. Also we want to try create visible breath (does anyone know how to do this when it isnt actually cold?)

Also desatuating the image, I think could help, whether I should do this with a filter or in post Im not yet sure.

Also giving the image a blue hue, with camera filters and or lighting colout temp, will surely help.

Ideally I would want to shoot on overcast days, but Im sure there will bright sunny days with hard shadows where I have to try make it look overcast and cold. I could try have the exterior scenes to be scheduled when the location is in shade but this will probably not be ideal time wise. Any ideas??

If anyone has experience creating this look I would love to hear from you.

Thanks,
Mel.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 09:04 AM

For a cool, low contrast "look", perhaps use a lower contrast tungsten balance film in daylight without filtration?:

http://www.kodak.com....4.4.4.14&lc=en
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 10:57 AM

There is so much you can do in telecine to make footage colder, greyer, etc. that in terms of stock, it doesn't really matter too much -- you could shoot on 100T stock if you wanted and use only a half-correction (like the 81EF) but you could take normal footage and make it bluer and less saturated in the telecine too. I do that all the time, shoot on daylight stock but use a warm or cold filter when shooting the grey scale to get the colorist to transfer the footage in the opposite tone (once I pull the filter.) So an orange 81EF on the grey scale, then removed, gets me a half-blue look on the footage, and a blue 82B filter on the grey scale only, then pulled, gets me a half-orange look. Or, of course, I could shoot the scene with the orange 81EF for a warm look or the 82B for a blue look.

The problem more will be getting the soft overcast light when the sun comes out. You may have to go through the bother of using 20'x20' and 12'x12' frames of diffusion like silk. Shooting under the shade of a tall building or heavy trees can help too. And shooting at magic hour.
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#4 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 05:10 PM

If it suits the script, some wetting down of locations and wardrobe will do a lot to sell cold and bleak. Gusts of wind from eg., waving a foamcore sheet close by the actors.
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#5 Chris Pritzlaff

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 05:30 PM

Also try to keep your locations out of direct light. Shoot under trees or behind buildings for example so that you do not see the hard light from direct sunlight. If necessary, use 20x20s with silks if you have to be out in the sun.
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#6 Melissa North

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 09:29 PM

Thanks.

Mel.
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rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

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