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8mm 16mm wedding


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#1 angelina

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 06:30 PM

I am planning on shooting in 8mm and 16mm for my sisters wedding. I am about to take class this summer introducing the bolex. So should I or should I not get a bolex? I don't know what kind of camera to invest in. I was a camera AC for the ARRi SR2 it was amazing. but i think it's too big for a wedding what do you think? I will rent.
and what kind of film should I use for 8mm and 16mm. I like the really saturated look. it's really nice. for 16mm
and would I be able to be hand held through out the whole thing. I would I need to experiment first. HEr wedding isn't till October so I have plenty of time. I just want to experiement now before I take the film class in July.
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 08:46 PM

I am planning on shooting in 8mm and 16mm for my sisters wedding. I am about to take class this summer introducing the bolex. So should I or should I not get a bolex? I don't know what kind of camera to invest in. I was a camera AC for the ARRi SR2 it was amazing. but i think it's too big for a wedding what do you think? I will rent.
and what kind of film should I use for 8mm and 16mm. I like the really saturated look. it's really nice. for 16mm
and would I be able to be hand held through out the whole thing. I would I need to experiment first. HEr wedding isn't till October so I have plenty of time. I just want to experiement now before I take the film class in July.

Kodachrome!
Actually any of the curent negaive films from Kodak or Fuji will giive you great results. Are you going to be shooting inside or out? If you do rent the Arri, The standrd Kodachome loads will be short. (100ft) of course that is all that will fit the bolex without the external mag.
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#3 Mike Rizos

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 10:37 PM

Since it's your sister's wedding and you would want to spend a lot of time participating in the activities, I would recomend you stick to super 8. It is much easier to use in run and shoot fashion.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 09:14 AM

I still treasure the Super-8 movies of our wedding in October 1972, shot on Kodak EKTACHROME 160 using a Kodak XL-55 camera.
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#5 Dominik Muench

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 10:34 AM

wow a wedding shot on film, thats awesome, i wish people around here had the money for that, then i would do wedding films too :)

good luck with it, if i ever get married i get one of you guys to shoot it on imax :)
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#6 angelina

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 01:04 PM

So if I shoot in 16mm. what type of camera? Bolex or Arri?
it will be ambient lighting during the day. I haven't figured out the night.
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#7 A.Oliver

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 01:18 PM

Hi, filmed a wedding last Saturday on super 8 kodachrome using a beaulieu 7008, previous wedding shoots have been mainly on super 8, two on 16mm. First, super 8 will give you a more 'once upon a time' look, super 8 is quicker to load, with a descent camera and using auto iris you should get more footage in the can compared to 16mm. For the saturated look and light permitting shoot kodachrome 40, 64t is a bit too grainy. Know your camera inside out before the big day. If you've never filmed a wedding, try and film one before hand. When i shot my sisters wedding i opted for 16mm k25, found that i waisted a lot of time reloading the camera, then holding back on certain scenes with the fear of running out of film. If you decide the 16mm route is for you, then the camera has to be the SR2 with pre-loaded mags. Again, lite permitting use 16mm k40, but make sure you know the stock inside out before the day and how it handles different lighting situations. If you are in the USA 16mm k40 is still available. If your final masterpeice is destined for dvd, then shoot neg, reversal stock is unforgiving if you mess up on the exposure. Knowing what i know now, i would not shoot a wedding with a single bolex camera, you will waiste too much time reloading. If you have access to two cameras and a loader then the bolex is a great choice. Also, this year will probably be your last chance to record some home movies on fade proof kodachrome.
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#8 ovidiu marginean

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 01:28 PM

So if I shoot in 16mm. what type of camera? Bolex or Arri?
it will be ambient lighting during the day. I haven't figured out the night.


a bolex will help you , i think.
may be with arc or with motor. with motor yoou need battery of course.
if you don;t need long takes arc is sufficient.
30m rolls are more compact and easy to use.
you can change them quiqly and load without changing tent.
i have a bolex ebm super16 super chic modified and proud of it.
hope it helps.

ovidiu marginean
www.cinematographer.ro
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#9 Matt Wells

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 07:01 AM

Remember that Boles only made Standard 8 and 16mm cameras - no super8. Thus I would avoid for 8mm, but recommend for 16mm.

I have shot a wedding on super 8 and one on 16mm. My own wedding was shot last year on 16mm - by two people from this forum!

My advice is:

If you know a lot of people at the event shoot super8 because this is easier to shoot and run kind of operation, and if you know people you will probably keep getting involved in converations etc.

For film I personally would always use colour negative. This is because you are going to have a transfer anyway, so you may aswell shoot neg and enjoy all the benefits such as the vast latitude - which will be very useful to you underpressure when you are haveing to operate quickly to capture important shots. Also when transferring neg you can make huge adjustments in colour / exposure to correct for errors.

Matt
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#10 Tim Shim

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 02:05 PM

I am planning on shooting in 8mm and 16mm for my sisters wedding. I am about to take class this summer introducing the bolex. So should I or should I not get a bolex? I don't know what kind of camera to invest in. I was a camera AC for the ARRi SR2 it was amazing. but i think it's too big for a wedding what do you think? I will rent.
and what kind of film should I use for 8mm and 16mm. I like the really saturated look. it's really nice. for 16mm
and would I be able to be hand held through out the whole thing. I would I need to experiment first. HEr wedding isn't till October so I have plenty of time. I just want to experiement now before I take the film class in July.


The Bolex is definitely cheaper to rent though the only issue other than size (Arri SR2) is noise (Bolex) - though a blimp could solve this somewhat for the Bolex. Whichever you pick depends on your preference or your willingness to put up with the inherent qualities of each camera.

For a saturated look, I'd recommend you try Fuji's Velvia 50D stock, now available from Spectra (http://www.spectrafilmandvideo.com). It's reversal film and will give you higher saturation and contrast right off the bat. The Velvia stock is a highly regarded filmstock by professional still photographers for its color saturation.

As for Super8, there are many cameras to choose from, but non from Bolex or Arri as I know. Depending on your camera budget, you could get the cheaper Nizos or Nikons or the more expensive Leicina or Beaulieus. I personally own and use the Nikon R10. It's affordable and works great.

Hope these personal insights help you decide. Cheers.
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#11 Will Montgomery

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 03:09 PM

Use both. You probably won't have time to do more than a couple loads on 16mm, so save it for slow-mo shots of the bride getting out of the limo or walking down the steps on the church, maybe a few smiles as she works the crowd. Then use super 8 for the rest so you can quickly change loads.

The trick will be in a good telecine which will cost you, but you can always go to HD later when the money is available.
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#12 Ole Dost

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 03:44 PM

I am planning on shooting in 8mm and 16mm for my sisters wedding. I am about to take class this summer introducing the bolex. So should I or should I not get a bolex? I don't know what kind of camera to invest in. I was a camera AC for the ARRi SR2 it was amazing. but i think it's too big for a wedding what do you think? I will rent.
and what kind of film should I use for 8mm and 16mm. I like the really saturated look. it's really nice. for 16mm
and would I be able to be hand held through out the whole thing. I would I need to experiment first. HEr wedding isn't till October so I have plenty of time. I just want to experiement now before I take the film class in July.



If you have to shoot hand held 16mm, I would also consider using the Canon Scoopic 16 (M). the viewfinder is always bright, it offers auto iris, electric filmtransport.... and no 16mm camera can be loaded so easy and so fast. The semi-automatic film treading really works! It´s a good compromise between a super 8 and a 16mm camera -it is as easy to use as a super 8, but the quality of the images is 16mm!
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#13 Ashley Dean Myles

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 06:02 PM

Ah fond memories... my own wedding was shot on S16mm Kodak Vision2 with an Arri SRII just a few short months ago. Of course, it's fitting since my husband and I got engaged in the telecine suite. Nothing like having your proposal on Kodak 7222 with a yellow/green filter :)

It was hard for our 1st AC (who shot the wedding for us) to change mags quickly and not miss too much of the ceremony. Of course, we were using 400' loads and not 100' daylight loads. What time of day and how long will the ceremony be? The Vision2 stocks were very forgiving for our sunset ceremony and evening reception. By the middle of the reception we couldn't even pull a meter reading but somehow we still got an exposure (albeit at 6fps).

I would definitely go for hand held, just as a personal preference as a bride. You'll be more manuverable and be able to come in close to the bride and groom. Trust me, those closeups are priceless to a bride.

Happy shooting,

Ashley Dean Myles

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Cage XXI Enterprises, Inc.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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