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Lenses going bad.


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#1 Hans Engstrom

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 02:44 PM

What beside dropping and heavily abusing a lens can make it go bad? I had a 35mm today that wasn´t sharp according to the scale. It has been sharp earlier but when I measured it after watching soft dailies it´s 25cm off at 2m. Me and the dp are the only one that handle the equipment. The only time it´s under someonelses supervision is during lunch. I have made a new focusring and going to get the lens replaced asap.
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 04:09 PM

Extreme temperatures could theoretically do that, but I actually haven't heard of that happen very often. It could just be that an element, or the focus ring, has slightly slipped or gone out of place. Some lenses can let an element go when you tilt them too much, or if they've been in a very shaky environment on a truck or a car mount, for instance.
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#3 Hans Engstrom

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 04:46 PM

Thanks for the reply. This movie is shot with handcamera running around like crazy all the time and shaking the camera so perhaps that can be the reason. It´s horrible watching doft dailies with the DP and director, and the director was satisfied with the performances from the actors so I´m going to have to live with those soft shots for the rest of my life:(
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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 05:51 PM

Always trust your eye first, lens markings second. Be especially sure that your back focus isn't off, or your shots at infinity will be soft.

Edited by dgoulder, 16 May 2006 - 05:53 PM.

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#5 Hans Engstrom

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:02 PM

Agree. Thats why I hate working with 35mm adapters on videocameras when not having an optical viewfinder or hi-res monitor on set. With a optical viewfinder this would easily have been avoided as not even the first actor that I just measured the distance to is in focus.
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Technodolly

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