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ASA setting for GYHD100U


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#1 Kim Camera

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:51 PM

Hi
Does any one know what the ASA setting is for JVC GYHD100U? It will help my cinematographer when he sets up his light meter to calibrate the foot-candles and the ASA setting.
Thanks
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 07:02 PM

Hi,

It's a video camera. While a light meter may be helpful when scouting locations or pre-rigging very big lights to give you an idea of coverage and depth-of-field, there's nothing better than just looking at the monitor, and through the viewfinder with zebra stripes on. A video camera is effectively a huge grid of spot meters.

Phil
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 04:22 AM

It depends how the camera is set up. On some recent tests I did shooting on HDV with the HD 100 the Standard gamma was around 200 ASA and Cine around 125 ASA. Both had manual knee setups (plus a few other changes from the factory set up) and I used my old G & D Cinematography chart in combination with the zebras (60 to 70%), so I wouldn't say it's as accurate has using a waveform monitor.

On one test report I read that the HD 100 is around a stop faster when shooting DV. I haven't tested this, but could be of interest to those wanting to use the camera mostly on MiniDV.

I wouldn't use the exposure meter to determine the final exposure, only to set the lights. For smaller stuff, as Phil says you don't need a meter, only for more complex lighting rigs is a meter useful. Even then I'd have a walk through with the camera to fine tune the f stop or adjust some lights.

Working by eye works extremely well.
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#4 Kim Camera

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 01:41 PM

It depends how the camera is set up. On some recent tests I did shooting on HDV with the HD 100 the Standard gamma was around 200 ASA and Cine around 125 ASA. Both had manual knee setups (plus a few other changes from the factory set up) and I used my old G & D Cinematography chart in combination with the zebras (60 to 70%), so I wouldn't say it's as accurate has using a waveform monitor.

On one test report I read that the HD 100 is around a stop faster when shooting DV. I haven't tested this, but could be of interest to those wanting to use the camera mostly on MiniDV.

I wouldn't use the exposure meter to determine the final exposure, only to set the lights. For smaller stuff, as Phil says you don't need a meter, only for more complex lighting rigs is a meter useful. Even then I'd have a walk through with the camera to fine tune the f stop or adjust some lights.

Working by eye works extremely well.

Thanks Brian and Phil. I checked around and it looks like it's back to the waveform and. vectorscope monitors. As you both say, use your eyes.
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#5 Peter Emery

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 12:56 PM

Thanks Brian and Phil. I checked around and it looks like it's back to the waveform and. vectorscope monitors. As you both say, use your eyes.


I've been setting my meter to 320ASA as a guide which seems about right. A useful tool but I've been using the monitor to actually set the stop on the lens.
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