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Any Experiences with Camera's Built-in 85 Filter and Kodak 64T (outside)??


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#1 Turbe

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:35 PM

Hello,

I would like to hear results from anyone that has used the built-in 85 Filter in their camera (not a 85b attached to the lens) and Kodak's Ektachrome 64T Super-8 Film (Quality, cast, color etc..)...

I have a Nikon R10 and Nizo 6080.. just wondering if I should purchase an 85B filter.. My processor here in Seattle recommends a 85B while shooting outside with 64T...

Thanks in advance..

Shawn
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#2 Rachel Oliver

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 03:32 PM

Hello,

I would like to hear results from anyone that has used the built-in 85 Filter in their camera (not a 85b attached to the lens) and Kodak's Ektachrome 64T Super-8 Film (Quality, cast, color etc..)...

I have a Nikon R10 and Nizo 6080.. just wondering if I should purchase an 85B filter.. My processor here in Seattle recommends a 85B while shooting outside with 64T...

Thanks in advance..

Shawn


Hi;

Just got back my 1st two rolls, I shot the first 30 secs with only the in camera filter inplace, then I threw on a 1.5R warming filter (a VERY subtle orange) The difference was very clear, without it was a little cold and blue, with filter it was.... well warmer and richer, I will be using the warming filter in future for this stock. Must say after the dismal reports I thought this stock was actually not bad at all! Although it was the 1st rolls I'd shot with my Leicina Special so that could have something to do with it ;)

Olly
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#3 A.Oliver

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 03:43 PM

Hi, the best results i have obtained with 64t is with a beaulieu 7008 with angenieux 6-80 lens using an 85 filter............ Must point out the lens is on the warm side, so this probably slightly compensates for not using an 85b. I did expose one cartridge thru the zeiss ms8, results were on the blue side, stock needs an 85b or as Olly has mentioned a warming up filter.
Going off topic, noticed Wittner are releasing fuji 64t in the super 8 cartridge, i think this stock has less grain than kodaks 64t
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#4 David W Scott

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 03:54 PM

I shot most of my tests with 85B on the lens. On one shot of a colour chart, I shot with the 85B and then the internal 85. I can't see any difference between the two. BUT -- To date my E64T tests have been processed by a lab using VNF chemistry. (They will be switching to E6 once people stop giving them VNF to process.) The result is a blue cast on the whole roll, especially in the shadows. This may be evening out the detectable difference between 85B and 85.

I will be shooting one more test in the next month, to be processed E6. I will try the 85 vs 85B again.

Will you be projecting or transfering to video? I have seen the telecine of a whole roll of E64T (E6 processed) shot with just the internal 85. The 200 degree difference in colour temperature is very easy to correct, and the footage looked great. Of course, the 85 in different cameras could be different colout temps, especially after 30 years.

So, if I was being cautious, I would say use 85B for projection, 85 or 85B for telecine.

Dave

Edited by David W Scott, 18 May 2006 - 03:56 PM.

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#5 Canney

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 04:24 PM

I shoot outside with the built in 85 filter in my camera. The footage came out with normal colors and looked fine. Normals colors. My camera was also one of the last super model S8 cameras made by B&H so that also might have something to do with it. But I like the stock. I think people rag on it too much because they are POD at kodak for discontinuing Kodachrome and stuff.
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#6 Turbe

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 05:07 PM

Thanks for the feedback and many thanks for this forum.. :)
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#7 Victor Mejia

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 08:16 PM

I've shot 64T with my Nizo S800. The internal filters worked great. Footage came out perfect.
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 09:15 PM

I would caution that a camera that is 20 or 30 or even 40 years old may very well have had some fading of the internal filter, which could vary with the camera manufacturer, and the storage conditions of the camera. For critical use, use an external filter or run tests.
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#9 Turbe

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 09:38 PM

Well, I just purchased a Beaulieu 5008 S Multispeed to add to my collection, so I will be doing some testing with that as well as the others...
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