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What's the Process here?


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#1 AvegaStudios

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 04:12 AM

Hey everyone. I do commercials and music videos, both are prolly hdcam or beta output. But I also will make dvd's for my clients. I'm basically filming, going to avid media composer and outputting to get it aired on tv and prolly dvd's for my clients.

What's my process if I were to use a super 16 camera? Firstly what do I do with the film in the reel once i finished filming? (where do I put the film after i use it in the camera). After that what are the processes to get film to tape so i can do editing on Avid Media Composer? And after my editing what do i output to for television and music video purposes (like getting it aired on tv)
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 10:55 AM

You need to read a textbook to answer all those questions.

The short answer is that the film gets downloaded in the dark into a black plastic bag, which then goes into a film can (you can get cans & bags at the lab), which is then taped up and labelled (footage length, shooting day, production name, camera roll number, film stock, special processing instructions, etc.) A camera report should also be taped to the can.

The lab processes the negative according to the work order you fill out when you drop it off (for example, most common request: PROCESS NORMAL / PREP FOR TELECINE).

The processed negative goes to a telecine house (maybe as part of the lab, or maybe you found a different company for the telecine work) where it is transferred to videotape in the format you request (many, many variations possible, some higher quality than others -- 4x3, 16x9, letterboxed in either, NTSC, PAL, 720P HDTV, 1080i or 1080P HDTV, different frame rates, different tape formats like beta-SP, digi-beta, DVCAM, HDCAM, HD-D5, etc. This is why you need to read some books...)

Color-correction can be either supervised by you, color-corrected shot-by-shot by the colorist following your instructions, or unsupervised. They can be entirely color-corrected or transferred rather flat-looking for future additional color-correction later by you, again, many variations.

A common approach for Super-16 material to be ultimately be delivered on DVD might be to transfer to 16x9 digi-beta (Digital Betacam), NTSC or PAL, for example, assuming you can work with digi-beta tapes in your post set-up, and assuming that you don't want to deliver an HD product.

At this point, the post path is probably similar to what you have been using for your videotaped projects.
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#3 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 12:14 PM

That was very nice of you to answer that Mr. Mullen.

I thought it was pretty assinine to want to shoot film, and not even consider how to go to digital without making it look like digital.
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#4 AvegaStudios

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 05:45 AM

what do you mean that was really confusing....
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