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Original Cut Neg in Telecine


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#1 Travis Cline

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 11:03 PM

I've posted about this before as I've been going through a semi-uncharted(at least for me) post workflow. The results were great so I figured I should share. I shot a feature last summer on 35mm negative. We, meaning the production, were always planning on going to print, so we did not pay for the more expensive dailies that would have allowed us to do a tape to tape final color correction. Besides being bad for a post workflow, getting cheap dailies will come back to bite you. There are probably 20 shots in the film that are out of focus and the director could not tell because the image was so soft overall on the dailies. I couldn't tell either, but what can we do at this point? Lesson learned I suppose. So, when I was put in charge of post production last month I was told the executive producers no longer wanted to pay for a print, but we needed to make a final video master. The solution we came up with was to cut the negative, take it to telecine, do a one light/best light, then do a tape to tape color correction. After having done it I have to say that I am quite pleased with the results. A company in Burbank named Negative People cut and spliced our negative. They did an amazing job and really worked hard to meet our deadline which was much appreciated. HTV in Universal City did the color correction and they were great. Our colorist was Michael Volland and he was terrific. I honestly have not had many experiences like that in telecine. He was great at getting a narrative look, if that makes sense. So often I have to fight with colorists to not give me so much contrast or calm down with the power windows, basically your typical commercial look. While that is great for spots, it drives me nuts when I am trying to tell a story and not selling something. Anyway, the cut negative held up well and there were no problems as some of you suggested before, so thank you all. Your advice gave me courage to go through with this workflow and it worked out wonderfully.

Travis

Edited by travisclinedp, 19 May 2006 - 11:05 PM.

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#2 Hal Smith

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 12:59 AM

so we did not pay for the more expensive dailies that would have allowed us to do a tape to tape final color correction. Besides being bad for a post workflow, getting cheap dailies will come back to bite you. There are probably 20 shots in the film that are out of focus and the director could not tell because the image was so soft overall on the dailies.
Travis

What format were the "cheap dailies"? What format would you have preferred to use?
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#3 David Cox

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 05:16 AM

It is a problem when labs use old telecines to create the "cheap" dailies. Yes, the intention is to create cheap media to cut from but dailies are also there to check the work, and often these old telecines are so grainy that you just can't use the dailies for quality control. I guess it's a matter of testing out the transfers from the lab beforehand.

David Cox
Baraka Post Production
www.baraka.co.uk
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#4 Travis Cline

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Posted 29 May 2006 - 10:18 PM

Absolutely, i'll never make that mistake again. the dailies were transfered to Beta SP and then dubbed onto MiniDV since we didn't have a Beta deck anyway. I'm not sure of the machine they used actually, but not good for sure. Sorry I don't have better information.

Travis
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