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source for motion stock in still camera spools


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#1 rndfilms

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 03:47 PM

Does anyone still provide motion film stock spooled into 35mm still camera cartridges, like Seattle Film works used to?
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 09:42 AM

Does anyone still provide motion film stock spooled into 35mm still camera cartridges, like Seattle Film works used to?


Been discussed many times before. Do a search.

Kodak and Fuji occasionally supply "samples" of their motion picture stocks, but AFAIK, not on a regular basis. Best to "load your own" with a Watson, Lloyd, or other daylight loader.

Still images are not the best way to compare films intended for motion picture use. Most labs prefer not to process short lengths of film through their ECN-2 process, due to the added risk of the additional splices breaking in the machine.
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#3 c_conditt

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 07:27 AM

Still images are not the best way to compare films intended for motion picture use. Most labs prefer not to process short lengths of film through their ECN-2 process, due to the added risk of the additional splices breaking in the machine.


Why is that? Is it just because of the short lenght of the negatives or is there an asthetical reason too? For me as a student it is not effortable to rent a 35mm camera and buy a whole role of stock just to do test. With some calculation of negative image size / focal lenght I can test the stock with almost the same results.
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#4 Filip Plesha

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 09:16 AM

How would you review these images? If you print them on paper optically by yourself you wouldn't get the right idea because the papers aren't calibrated for such film, you'd probably get wierd contrast and color casts or something like that.
And if you gave it to a minilab, the digital corrections would give you a compleatly different look, usually with too much contrast and saturated colors. Minilab machines blow out highlights, gives too much contrast, makes ugly edge artefacts, blocks grain, and screws up the color crossover. And the crowd loves it!

The only usefull thing would be if someone could make you slides on motion picture print stock that you can project (or look at on a lighttable), otherwise any such test is useless.

Otherwise the only esthetical difference between a still image and an image in motion is grain. Grain somehow feels more natural when in motion, while when you look at it in still it can look like garbage. Plus any image feels sharper and higher in resolution when it is in motion because your brain blends information from different frames into one.
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#5 Nathan D. Lee

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:42 AM

RGB used to do that very thing, make slide prints from ENC2 films for just those reasons. Unfortunately they went out of business. I don?t know where to get it done now. Which is why I have a ton of movie film in still film cans I will probably throw away.

Nathan
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 10:14 AM

RGB used to do that very thing, make slide prints from ENC2 films for just those reasons. Unfortunately they went out of business. I don?t know where to get it done now. Which is why I have a ton of movie film in still film cans I will probably throw away.

Nathan


Again, most motion-picture labs hesitate to offer processing of short lengths of 35mm film due to the added risk of one of the many splices breaking in the processing machine. At the very least, they are likely to require a special run, so there is no other footage put at risk in the machine.

The business case for labs offering service to this small "niche" market is usually not strong enough to justify. And as mentioned, even if you properly color correct and print the images to slides, still images are not the best way to evaluate differences in motion picture films.
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